I came across Dr. Kevin Tolliver’s post, "Beware the Limits of Telemedicine," and found it to gloss over the benefits of telemedicine and the opportunities that increasing telemedicine uptake can afford to the patient and provider. With this post, I aim to show that these opportunities for systemic change to the health care delivery model – particularly driven by telemedicine – surpass the listed limitations of telemedicine. The ...

Read more...

The Kaiser Health News article, "Spurred By Convenience, Millennials Often Spurn The ‘Family Doctor’ Model," caught my eye. Millennial patients want “convenience, fast service, connectivity, and price transparency” while doctors and health experts worry about “fragmented or unnecessary care, including the misuse of antibiotics” and loss of  “care that is coordinated and longitudinal.” It’s as if the needs of the patients and the concerns of doctors are ...

Read more...

Teleneurology is the new and vastly expanding practice of neurology involving the use of technology and/or video chat to improve access to services. With an ever-increasing aging population there is and will continue to be a shortage of neurologists in the United States. Teleneurology has increased patient access to neurologists especially in rural areas but also in urban and suburban areas. Practicing as a teleneurologist for the last two years I ...

Read more...

I mused while staring blankly towards the electronic tracking board, where I foresee reading the triage call "My tracker said, I have AFib." I delved into what is in my armamentarium to handle this crisis of the digital age. The stethoscope around my neck suddenly seemed archaic. We the physicians have resigned to the redundant clicks on the electronic medical records (EMR). While still recovering from this inescapable occupational hazard of ...

Read more...

STAT_LogoThe announcement that the next iteration of the Apple Watch can both monitor the wearer’s heart rhythm and, if a suspicious reading emerges, perform an electrocardiogram, could be a boon for users and their doctors. Or it could be a massive headache for the health care system. The new watch continuously monitors the wearer’s heart rate. It ...

Read more...

When I became a physician years ago, the idea of telehealth had barely taken hold among doctors or patients. Today, as we bask in the passage of the CHRONIC Care Act of 2017, we’re seeing dozens of use cases in stroke, emergent care, psychiatry and more that underscore telehealth’s potential. Consumers are becoming increasingly digitally savvy too — and not just the millennials. Today, about one in five adults
Read more...

I’d be willing to bet most of you have heard of, or previously used, telemedicine in some shape, form or fashion.  Stated simply, telemedicine is the process of seeking care from a medical provider using your phone or laptop.  This field is exploding, and I have no doubt popularity will continue to grow as large health systems and pharmacy giants dive in. It’s easy to appreciate the convenience and efficiency of ...

Read more...

The health care industry is experiencing a crisis. There’s a shortage of highly skilled doctors. And as a result, doctors are working long hours that are affecting their stress levels, increasing burnout rates, health and the ability to diagnose their patients properly. This piece will discuss the many solutions to this problem: from offering better, more integrative training to doctors, using telemedicine to provide patients ...

Read more...

The digital divide used to be about who had internet access and who didn't, with broad implications for every aspect of life — especially health care. But digital health innovation is growing rapidly, with projections showing a $536.6 billion market by the end of 2025 compared to the $179.6 billion market at the end of 2016. So, what does that mean for the digital divide? We ...

Read more...

Attend any biotech or health informatics conference and one thing becomes clear: the scarcity of physicians. Entrepreneurs, businessmen, angel investors, and software engineers swarm these conferences -- and their encompassing companies -- all the while the imperative persona in this realm remains tied up behind a dysfunctional EHR or in an overbooked operating room. Why? Certainly, inculcating these dynamic players in the health care space is integral to the successful evolvement ...

Read more...

“There’s an app for that.” The phrase became so popular with the advent of smartphones that Apple even trademarked it. There are currently 3.8 million apps available on Android devices and over 2 million available to Apple iPhone users. Does that mean that we’ve reached a limit on new and useful apps that can be created? Absolutely not. Especially in the medical world, it seems as if there’s so much room to ...

Read more...

After a Harvard endocrinology course several years ago, I walked out into the weak afternoon spring sunshine and crossed the street to the Boston Public Garden. Among the multitude of faces of the other flaneurs I was certain I saw scores of people suffering from endocrine diseases -- probably undiagnosed, I thought to myself: I saw tall men with big jaws, typical of acromegaly; stout women with skinny extremities and ...

Read more...

Modern technology needs to do better. This is the message delivered by every CEO after every Silicon Valley scandal in recent memory. This time, they should really do it. Medicine can show them how. Let's have the professionals building our future abide by industry-wide standards, just as doctors do. As both a startup founder and a physician, this idea makes intuitive sense to me. Drawing on my experience treating patients and running ...

Read more...

When I was a cardiology fellow back in the 1980s, I learned about a variety of early tools for evaluating heart health that had been displaced by the modern standards of electrocardiography (ECG, or EKG for the Deutschephiles) and echocardiography. One such technique – ballistocardiography – stuck with me, and may be making a comeback. Ballistocardiography is based on the observation that the mechanical action of the heart leads to subtle ...

Read more...

One late evening on pediatrics call, a frantic young couple brought in their few weeks old baby. She had spiked a fever which refused to go down and was fussier than normal. The cause of her symptoms could have been anything -- at best, a mild respiratory infection, in which case we would simply watch her and manage her symptoms, but at worst, it could be meningitis, an infection attacking ...

Read more...

Like many physicians, I entered medicine with a desire to care for patients in an engaged and collaborative fashion, not shuttle them through the exam room and out the door. After finishing my residency in family medicine in the 1990s and working in a few different clinical settings to start out, I found myself at a hospital-owned clinic, where the culture of “feeding the mothership” prevailed and accomplishments were measured ...

Read more...

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke that has escalated to alarming rates in recent years, affecting nearly 1 in 3 adults in the U.S. In an attempt to reduce its prevalence, the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC-8) released a set of hypertension management guidelines. However, various concerns arose regarding the recommendations and as a result, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and ...

Read more...

Health care is obsessed with new technology. Every week, a new article comes out promising disruption of medical care as we know it through personalized genetic therapy, app extensions that transform smartphones into ultrasounds or autonomous surgical robots. Yet, one of the best examples of health care technologies is also one of its oldest — instant messaging. Though the original messaging platform AOL Instant Messenger was sadly discontinued at the end ...

Read more...

It has become more and more evident with time that the health care delivery system here in the United States is riddled with issues. One with many disagreements arising from the fact that there is no clear and universally acceptable solution to our problems. In many ways, the system seems to step on its own feet — as the health care professionals working within it fight to make it work ...

Read more...

The ad is compelling. A surfer rides a blue wave, seen from below in crystal clear reflection. The Apple Watch on his left arm cuts through the surf, elegant, sparkling ripples trailing behind. Suddenly, it breaks the surface, and the screen lights up, announcing an incoming call. Let’s face it, shall we? We are always connected. We are always wired in. We are always on. We have become a world of interconnected people, ...

Read more...

Most Popular

✓ Join 150,000+ subscribers
✓ Get KevinMD's most popular stories