An excerpt from Private Equity in Gastroenterology: Navigating the Next Wave. A long time ago, gastroenterologists ran solo or small group practices. Despite the myriad challenges of running a medical business, doctors enjoyed the independence that private practices offered. But over the years, everything got too complicated. From insurance reimbursements to ...

Read more...

Recently, I was at a health care facility in a semi-urban region, less than 100 miles from a major metro. It had a whiff of industry from good times that have long drifted by. I tried to locate a Starbucks. Google Maps spotted one and took me towards the local university campus. As I drove there, I noticed several pain management clinics advertising themselves in unusual ways for "relief." Once inside the ...

Read more...

If you throw a pebble today, it's likely to land on an article that talks about how artificial intelligence and its brother — machine learning — are changing health care. Yes, I get it broadly. But I was curious to explore how exactly health care's trends are shaping a single medical specialty. I chose gastroenterology (GI) because I'm most familiar with the space. And here's what I found. Trend #1: Manipulating bacteria ...

Read more...

Instead of driving on the highway, let’s imagine you drove upwards from wherever you are. You’ll reach space in about an hour. On your way up, you’ll begin to see everything differently. Cities, roads, and trees slowly blur out to make way for a new kind of reality. Converging. Diverging. Both at the same time. What appears dissimilar on the ground (trees and shrubs) will appear similar (green). What unites on the ...

Read more...

Just like you, I'm trying to make sense of the world around me. But there are no templates for the bridge that health care's building for its future. All we can do is listen to weak signals and amplify them. Recently (and finally), CVS bought Aetna for $69 billion. I spoke to someone intimately familiar with the deal. He called it "vertical stacking" — to expand what CVS customers can get — ...

Read more...

Well, they are calling it the golden age of rectums! The trends are simple and straightforward. First, Baby Boomers and beyond are aging and staying alive longer. The gut, a hidden culprit behind many ailments, requires continuous maintenance. Colonoscopies, EGDs and ERCPs. These require services of gastroenterologists (GIs) who are always in short supply (14,000 in the U.S.).4 Second, gastroenterology practices are fragmented like hotels were before the Hilton. Regulatory, technological and ...

Read more...

In country after country, I witness the same sad situation: caring, often-brilliant men and women toil in the health care industry to care for others, but to do so they must battle the system itself. That system has lost sight of what matters, which is humans caring for other human beings. To simplify things a bit, every health care system on earth has three main stakeholders:

  1. Patients
  2. Physicians and clinicians
  3. Administrators
Yes ...

Read more...

“I love what I do. I hate what I have to do.” It's a quote that doctors attribute to their profession behind closed doors. As patients, we are so overwhelmed with our own problems. We fail to notice that our doctor may be battling her own problems with a complicated system. But what do we care? Our meeting with the doctor is a paid transaction. We are owed our money's due. Empathy ...

Read more...

It's easy to get excited about technological advances such as nanobots that swim in blood to deliver drugs or 3-D printers that print human tissues. However, in our enthusiasm to find the next fix, we are failing to notice the ground slipping underneath the health care industry. Here are four trends that are changing health care but on the surface are too unsexy for us to care about. Trend 1: The doctor-patient ...

Read more...

Before the invention of the stethoscope, doctors routinely laid their ears on chests of patients to check how they were doing. Homemade concoctions, essentially placebos, often made people feel better. Doctors visited homes of patients who would later pay them whatever they could afford. Local apothecaries sold morphine, a derivative of opium, to reduce pain. Medicine for its part was a nascent science - most of today’s diseases were yet ...

Read more...

2 Pages

Most Popular

Join 150,000+ subscribers

Get the best of KevinMD in your inbox

Sign me up! It's free. 
close-link
✓ Join 150,000+ subscribers 
✓ Get KevinMD's 5 most popular stories
Subscribe. It's free.