Historically, American physicians and surgeons were fiercely independent practitioners, who owned their own practices, worked long days and maybe longer nights, made a good income, but saw little of their families. They trained in a male-dominated world in "residency," so named originally because their extended 120 hour/week work schedule demanded them living in dormitory type residence adjacent to the hospital. They developed long-standing professional commitment to their patients that superceded time ...

Read more...

The American public seems to consider cancer and cardiovascular disease in diametrically opposing ways. Cancer evokes the threat of relentless, painful suffering and whatever medical science can do to delay the judgement day is appreciated. Therapeutic regimens may involve disfiguring operations, prolonged toxic irradiation and chemotherapeutic agents that may be beneficial if they do not kill you first. Response to treatment of limited incidence and duration are accepted and deemed beneficial. ...

Read more...

The public gets much of its health-related news from lay-oriented synopses of scientific papers published in refereed medical journals or presentations at major medical conventions. Longer, more detailed commentary is published in the print media, but the majority are short pieces posted on many websites or blogs. I try to familiarize myself with information pertaining to cardiovascular disease as well as predisposing conditions such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia with the ...

Read more...

It is my strong contention that patients facing cardiac surgery should choose an institution, not a particular heart surgeon. Although individual judgement and technical dexterity are obviously important, best surgical outcomes reflect the performance of many medical providers before, during and after the operation. Professionalism and a competitive business environment both stimulate open heart centers to continuously focus on quality assurance programs to improve patient safety. Also, continuing medical ...

Read more...

I was reading the other day in a magazine the personal account of a woman who had a "perfect example of a mitral valve click" (a type of heart murmur) that was so textbook in sound that she was asked to be a listening post for a class of medical students. She was pleased to help, but was disappointed in how of the 15 examiners no one treated her like ...

Read more...

1 Pages

Most Popular

Join 141,000+ subscribers

Get the best of KevinMD in your inbox

Sign me up! It's free. 
close-link
✓ Join 141,000+ subscribers 
✓ Get KevinMD's 5 most popular stories
Subscribe. It's free.
close-image