At first, it may seem strange that "physician" and "side gig" are even used in the same sentence.  After all, the average physician in the United States is already working more than a 40 hour work week and struggling with issues related to work-life balance.  As someone who talks about physician burnout and as the founder of the Physician Side Gigs Facebook group, I've been asked many times how adding ...

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As someone who talks to many physicians about burnout and life in medicine, I find myself having a lot of discussions about the circumstances of people’s jobs. Almost inevitably, there comes a point in the conversation where someone expresses dissatisfaction about an aspect of their contract or an additional responsibility that was placed on them. As physicians, we’re groomed to take care of patients. During training, we don’t talk about compensation, ...

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Yes, suggestions for improvement are coming at you from every angle.  Administrators, your patients, your colleagues, your mother, yourself.  It’s quite possible that the last thing you feel you need are resolutions.  But for those of you that are looking to make some concrete changes in 2017, here are some to consider: 1. Take care of yourself as well as you take care of your patients. 2016 has proven to us ...

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On November 18, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that Zika will no longer be classified as a public health emergency, while maintaining that the epidemic remains “a highly significant and long-term problem,” and emphasizing that this change in designation did not represent a downgrade, but rather an escalation in its long-term importance. Most major news outlets rushed to report the news, with headlines focusing on the end of the emergency ...

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In a time of rising health care costs, it’s hard to talk about the financial strife of physicians, who as a whole over time do very well financially. We see the bills from our doctor’s office, and it’s hard to imagine why anybody would complain about the upfront investment of a medical education, when the payoff seems so good. Many recent articles make the case for why becoming a physician is ...

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Recently, an African American female physician was prevented from providing help to a passenger in distress on a Delta airlines flight because she didn’t fit the flight attendant’s image of what a doctor looked like. The racial and gender issues that this event highlight are readily apparent.    As a South Asian, I have to say I’ve never been told I don’t look like a doctor on a racial basis.  If anything, ...

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Many of my best friends are in the medical field, and there are practical reasons for that.  That said, I don’t think I could survive without the perspective of my equally good friends outside of medicine.  In one way or the other, they are always reminding me of the following things: 1. Don’t take yourself so seriously. It’s true that at work we often deal with life or death situations.  But ...

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(Because sometimes my brain processes information in the form of a radiology report.) EXAMINATION: Analysis of physician burnout CLINICAL INDICATION: Increasing use of term physician burnout, particularly via social media, and need to address associated connotations/perceptions TECHNIQUE: Non-scientific retrospective review of popular published pieces on the topic and comments platforms on these articles COMPARISON: Innumerable articles on the topic and experiences of professional and personal contacts FINDINGS: The number of articles about physician burnout have ...

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1. You either over or under-react to everything related to your child’s health. Your kid chokes?  You perform the Heimlich and are back to dinner conversation 2 minutes later.  Your infant spits up a little more than usual after their introduction to rice cereal?  You decide they may have FPIES and stay up all night worried they may require tube feeds.  True story. 2. You can’t go to ...

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Women physicians are a testament to evolution; they’ve spent years, decades even, navigating through systems that do anything but cater to their unique needs, and actually find a way to thrive within these systems. My question is this: Why haven’t these systems really evolved with them? It’s now been 167 years since Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman to graduate with a medical degree in the United States. Nowadays, just shy of ...

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