asco-logo In the second week of April, I headed to San Francisco where I took part in the SWOG Semi-Annual Meeting. To those who might be unfamiliar with us, SWOG is a member organization of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and is tasked in running clinical trials across disease sites and scenarios, from prevention to ...

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asco-logo In an era where health information is freely flowing thanks to the internet and Dr. Google, I’ve come to expect that patients who see me for the first time will have done their homework -- about their cancer, treatment options, and yes, even about me. To be frank, it’s not uncommon for patients to mention they’ve ...

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asco-logo Perhaps one of the hardest things about medicine is cross-coverage, that is, to be the covering doctor for your partners, whether for the occasional night, weekend, or longer. It’s not something done only in oncology. All specialties in medicine have this system, which allows us to have lives outside of our hospitals and clinics. What’s ...

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asco-logoI’ve written in the past about how words are powerful — that they can have multiple meanings, how they can change depending on context. I am often reminded of how true that is in everyday oncology practice, especially when it comes to meeting new patients. Some are diagnosed with cancers that carry a relatively good prognosis, ...

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asco-logoMedicine is an honorable profession. We meet people at a vulnerable point in their lives -- when it comes to cancer, it is often at their most vulnerable. In oncology, care is typically multidisciplinary, and one of the most important advances in my own professional career has been this team approach. To see a patient with ...

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asco-logo Part of the challenge in oncology is the balance between hope and reality, and that is probably the most important thing to strive for for patients living with metastatic disease. Often times, the important conversations relate to treatment options, goals of care, and patient preferences (i.e., how frequent the visits to the doctor and for ...

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asco-logo I have been fortunate enough to find a home in academic medicine. Most of that time I’ve spent in oncology -- working with residents, fellows, and colleagues on projects, whether they be chart-based or prospectively designed trials. I’ve lectured a ton, and written even more. Yet, my experience in academia has also allowed me to ...

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asco-logoI consider myself lucky to be the father to three wonderful kids: My oldest is now 15 and my twins are 9. They are indeed the light of my life. I get asked every so often, why did you want kids? It is a fair question, I suppose. After all, my partner and I relied on ...

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asco-logo As an oncologist, I want to provide the best treatment for everyone. That should mean the best chance at a long-lasting remission, if not cure. Whatever that might take. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy -- a dark tunnel that I hope patients will enter and then exit, with the sun shining on the other side. But, every ...

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asco-logo Starting a new job is always stressful -- the move from one institution to another, getting hospital credentials, obtaining provider credentialing for various insurances, meeting new staff, and adjusting to a new work “culture”. Having done my share of moves, these are nearly universal experiences.  However, as I find myself walking around the hallowed halls ...

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