The ancient Greeks were one of the first groups of philosophers to recognize and describe the complexity of love. Eros: an intense, passionate form of love. Philia: a deep friendship or affection. Philautia: love for one’s self. Agape: an unconditional love for humanity. These same complexities in love forms described by the Greeks play an important role in how we treat our patients in medicine. Eros allows us to have the passion ...

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As a boy growing up in a small town in Pennsylvania, I never gave much thought to the concept of a kiss. My family gave and received kisses without hesitation. I continue to give and receive kisses from my wife and kids in the same nonchalant manner. Until one night — on shift. I work in the ER of a medium-sized town in southern Oregon. It was late into my shift. The ...

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This was a momentous week for me. After 14 years of carrying a hospital-grade old-school text pager to receive messages at work, I finally traded it in for a cell phone app. It should have been easy to get rid of my beeper. But instead, I felt waves of nostalgia when I turned it off for the last time. Those 240-character, pre-Twitter, low-resolution LCD messages follow the arc of my ...

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I am a physician in recovery and just celebrated my fifth-year anniversary on October 11, 2017. While in active addiction, my drugs of choice were benzodiazepines and opioids that I washed down with top-shelf alcohol. Near the end of my usage, I was diverting scheduled drugs in order to feed my addiction. After an unsuccessful suicide attempt, I finally admitted myself for treatment. As part of the treatment process, I enrolled with ...

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On September 5th, 2017, the Trump administration denounced the further implementation of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and called for its revocation in 6 months. Opponents quickly voiced their concerns towards the unjust decree. Now, the deadline is near and a heightened urgency to act is imperative. To encourage advocacy and help legislators understand the vitality of DACA-recipients, the following displays the power of the undocumented. Days after news of ...

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When my children each finished Montessori school, my wife and I researched a bit before choosing the local public option.  My area has extraordinary private schools.  Although high cost, many of these alternatives provide unique and worthwhile twists on traditional education.  We talked extensively with the kids, and after much research, we came to the budgetary friendly decision.  The public school, with somewhat fewer bells and whistles, provided an education on ...

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Early this month, Joanna Gaines, co-host of HGTV’s popular Fixer Upper, shared her pregnancy news with the world via a baby bump photo and an ultrasound, both posted to Instagram. The congratulations began pouring in from excited fans. But the conversation took a dark turn when a physician commented that the ultrasound appeared to ...

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study from the National Bureau of Economic Research reports on the results of a large randomized controlled trial of a large employer with over 12,000 employees. Program eligibility and financial incentives were randomized at the individual level. Over 56 percent of eligible treatment group employees participated. The study found that in the first year, the employees who signed up were healthier and had lower medical costs, but, and ...

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Doctors are intelligent people, but are we good thinkers? And how should we think? There are two basic kinds of thinking: analytic and intuitive. (And maybe good and bad, so that’s four.) Within medicine, analytic thinking can perhaps be best exemplified in the evidence-based movement, which began in the early 1990’s. It was a gilded age, full of promise, and bolstered by the reality that computers would give physicians instant access to the ...

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They came from all corners of the globe to bid him farewell. He looked cachetic, his frail form interrupted by swelling in his abdomen and legs, a result of end-stage pancreatic cancer. It was Dr. Yeat’s last week in the hospital before being transferred to a nearby hospice.  He was now on morphine, and despite severe fatigue and difficulty breathing, he always managed a smile. Some of his visitors were former ...

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