Obesity in American children and adults continues to grow

by Emily P. Walker

The number of obese adults in the U.S. continues to rise, despite a growing number of federal anti-obesity initiatives in the past two years, according to a new report.

The seventh annual “F as in Fat” report, released Tuesday by the nonprofit Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, found that obesity rates continued to rise in 28 states from 2007 through 2009.

Nationally, two-thirds of …

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Android and iPhone pros and cons for healthcare

by Jeff Brandt

I wrote an article for KevinMD.com several months ago discussing the benefits of Android for the healthcare market. I also compared Android with the iPhone.   I listed the iPhone’s technical shortcomings and really angered the “believers of all things Apple”.  That was not my intent.

Apple’s latest release of iPhone 4.0 and their new operating system (OS) 4.0 corrects many of …

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Was JUPITER trial data influenced by AstraZeneca to favor Crestor?

by Charles Bankhead

Reanalysis of a landmark cholesterol-lowering trial of people typically considered at low risk for heart attacks indicated that the results are flawed — and do not support the primary-prevention benefits that made headlines, authors of the review asserted.

The reanalysis of the massive JUPITER trial involving almost 18,000 people with low or normal cholesterol but elevated levels of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) — turned up no evidence …

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Medications that increase the risk of photosensitivity

by Marianna Rakovitsky, RPh

Oh, Summer! The weather is warm, the sun is shining and it is the time when we try to get outside as much as possible. Summer is my favorite time of the year. I love the beach, days that are filled with light and sunshine,  trips to the orchards and hanging out in the backyard. The sunshine that makes the summer such a …

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Caring for dying patients needs better physician communication

by Michael Smith

Clinicians treating dying patients did well in managing pain but fell short on communicating with patients and their loved ones, researchers said.

The findings, from a single-institution study, suggest that those who care for terminal patients also often failed to assess shortness of breath in a dying patient whose mechanical ventilation was withdrawn, according to Anne Walling, MD, of the University of California Los Angeles, and colleagues.

But overall those …

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