Meds

Create a disease to market a new drug

An excerpt from White Coat, Black Hat.

by Carl Elliott

Many of us have a relatively simple, commonsense view of the way that drug development and marketing work.

People get diseases; scientists develop drugs to treat those diseases; and marketers sell the drugs by showing that the drugs work better than their competitors. Sometimes, however, this pattern works in reverse. Drug company scientists develop a drug …

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Finasteride, fruit, and the matter of prostate health

by Arnon Krongrad, MD

The noose was loose on its neck. At first I worried, but then I relaxed. This was a bottle of pomegranate juice, the antioxidant superpower. As the billboard implied, it could cheat death. Perhaps if I consumed pomegranate juice, I could cheat death.

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission charged POM Wonderful, LLC, makers of pomegranate products, with deceptive advertising. …

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Medications that increase the risk of photosensitivity

by Marianna Rakovitsky, RPh

Oh, Summer! The weather is warm, the sun is shining and it is the time when we try to get outside as much as possible. Summer is my favorite time of the year. I love the beach, days that are filled with light and sunshine,  trips to the orchards and hanging out in the backyard. The sunshine that makes the summer such a …

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The Massachusetts gift ban benefits health insurance companies

by Edison Wong, MD

With the recent proposal to repeal the so-called Massachusetts “gift ban” (more appropriately referred to as the “interaction ban”), I asked myself who stands to gain the most from such bans?

Is it the consumers or patients? Is it the physicians or their practices? Is it the federal or state governments? Nope. Sadly, it is the insurers who gain the most, at the expense of patients.

The …

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Multiple vaccines in infants are harmful, a theory disproved

by John Gever

Worries that cramming multiple vaccinations into the first months of life slows brain development have no basis in fact, researchers said.

There was no evidence of neurodevelopmental delays or deficits associated with on-time vaccination in an intensively studied cohort of more than 1,000 children, according to Michael J. Smith, MD, and Charles R. Woods, MD, of the University of Louisville, in the June issue of Pediatrics.

“These data may reassure …

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