Conditions

Pediatricians have a role in reporting domestic violence

by Crystal Phend

One of the most effective ways to prevent child abuse may be for pediatricians to identify domestic violence against a child’s caregiver, according to a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Intimate partner violence in the home has a profound effect on kids, Jonathan D. Thackeray, MD, of Columbus Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and colleagues wrote in the May issue of Pediatrics.

They pointed to elevated risk of …

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C-section rates as a marker for obstetric care quality

by Michael Smith

When cesarean section rates are lower than expected, adverse maternal or neonatal outcomes are higher, researchers said.

But the converse isn’t true — higher-than-expected C-section rates aren’t associated with a protective effect, according to Sindhu Srinivas, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues.

The finding comes from an attempt to see if the risk-adjusted C-section rate can be used as a marker for the quality of obstetric care, Srinivas …

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Causes of Beau Biden’s stroke

Beau Biden, son of Vice President Joe Biden, suffered a stroke today.

beau bidenHe is 41-years old, and is expected to make a full recovery according to the medical director of the Center for Heart and Vascular Surgery at Christiana Care Health System:

Biden has what the doctors “believe to be a mild stroke,” according to Gardner. “[He is] “fully alert, …

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MKSAP: A 21-year-old man is evaluated for painful mouth sores

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians.

A 21-year-old man is evaluated for painful sores in his mouth. Episodes of these sores have occurred two to three times yearly since he was 16 years old, and he believes they are associated with stress. They usually appear on the inside of his mouth as a single, round, painful lesion, lasting for 5 …

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Hiatal hernia in women can present with heartburn

by David Edelman, MD

Heartburn and acid reflux disease are common problems affecting women of all ages. The problem develops when acid in the stomach backs up into the esophagus. There is a muscle known as the diaphragm that separates the chest from the abdominal cavity. When you eat or drink, the food goes from the mouth down the esophagus, through the diaphragm and into the stomach. …

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Indoor tanning can be an addictive behavior

by John Gever

“Jersey Shore” wannabes beware: some people crave the indoor tanning experience so much that it qualifies as an addiction, researchers said.

Among 229 college students completing a survey, 39.3% met DSM-IV criteria for addiction, reported Catherine E. Mosher, PhD, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and Sharon Danoff-Burg, PhD, of the State University of New York at Albany, in the April issue of Archives of Dermatology.

Participants …

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Autistic enterocolitis may not be real

by Todd Neale

The status of a new inflammatory bowel condition identified in the retracted Lancet paper that linked the MMR vaccine and autism — autistic enterocolitis — appears to be in limbo.

The 1998 paper by Andrew Wakefield, MBBS, and colleagues was fully retracted by The Lancet in February, although the alleged and repeatedly disproven vaccine link was dropped in 2004 …

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Inhalant abuse remains prevalent in teens

by Todd Neale

Although inhalant abuse has become less prevalent since the early 1990s in all age groups, it remains a source of injury and death, particularly among teenagers, researchers have found.

From 1993 to 2008, intentional exposure to 3,410 different inhalants was reported to U.S. poison control centers, Toby Litovitz, MD, of the National Capital Poison Center in Washington, and colleagues reported in the May issue of Pediatrics.

The highest rate of …

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Medical device security may be vulnerable to hackers

by Kristina Fiore

Although no such attacks have yet been reported, medical devices could be susceptible to hackers, and a thorough security analysis should be done as part of FDA approval, researchers argue.

Premarket regulatory evaluation should include a risk-based security assessment depending on the nature of the device and the perceived threat of a security compromise, said William H. Maisel, MD, MPH, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Boston, and …

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CT scans for lung cancer screening may not save lives

Should smokers receive screening CT scans?

As it stands, there’s no evidence that screening patients with either chest x-rays or CT scans save lives, but a large, federally-funded study should yield some answers in the next year or so.

Recently, however, there’s data suggesting that screening chest CT scans for lung cancer gives a lot of false positives. Needless to say, these false positives are magnified with CT scans versus …

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Treating critically ill patients on Mount Everest

Ken Kamler tells an incredible story of collective resilience in the face of one of the most dangerous mountaineering expeditions ever attempted: “I was faced with treating a lot of critically ill patients at 24,000 feet, which was an impossibility.”

Incredible lecture from TEDMED 2009.

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Speep apnea increases stroke risk in men

by Charles Bankhead

Severe obstructive sleep apnea almost tripled stroke risk in men, data from a prospective cohort study showed.

Among men with mild or moderate apnea, each one-unit increase in the obstructive apnea hypopnea index (OAHI) raised stroke risk by 6%. Obstructive sleep apnea did not have a significant association with stroke risk in women, investigators reported online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

“This study provides compelling …

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