Foleys for convenience

Perhaps this speaks more for the nursing shortages in the country:

Nearly one in four older hospitalized patients received a urinary catheter without any medical reason for one, and these patients tended to be the ones who would need the most help going to the bathroom if left un-catheterized, said Seth Landefeld, M.D., of the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center here.

A family medicine director is scared for the future:

Medicine is again overspecializing, fueled by a market-driven health-care system that promotes the expansion of procedural medicine and specialty practices that create large profit margins. Primary-care physicians are increasingly employed by health-care corporations that judge and pay them mainly on the basis of productivity. Our reimbursement system is not designed to reward spending time with patients to counsel, educate and to ...

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This exposes the turf wars that are present in every hospital:

According to the suit filed in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, Feldman's e-mail stated:

"I have been informed now on multiple occasions by our house staff at Methodist, as well as by one of our cardiology fellows who moonlights there, that the ED attendings (at the instigation of the ED director) are urging and pushing ...

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NYT on in-store health clinics. Since they will be on the front-line with limited resources (i.e. no lab, no x-ray, staffed by mid-level practitioners), I would like to see how they do after a few well-publicized malpractice cases.

I harped on this before, now another physician feels the same way:

As a practicing general internist, I feel like an endangered species.

I am in my mid-50s, and planning my retirement. I have watched many of my colleagues leave the practice of general internal medicine, and I have seen few younger colleagues replace them.

There are many factors that cause general internists to leave the practice, ...

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British Columbia gets it

If you want more people to go into primary care, you have to increase salary. Nothing is a stronger incentive for medical students.

Dr. Crippen probably won't be happy about this:

Nurse practitioners are gaining broader acceptance by health insurers and medical regulators. In Iowa, Oregon and a dozen other states, nurse practitioners can operate without doctors' collaboration or supervision. Most states allow the nurses to prescribe the vast majority of drugs, with the exception of controlled substances such as narcotics.

Medicare, the U.S. insurance program for the elderly and ...

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The future of primary care? Dr. Crippen takes aim at mid-level providers:

Medical judgment is acquired gradually over a long period of time. A bedrock of two to three years scientific training, supplemented by three years clinical experience, followed by many more years of medical apprenticeship before you become an independent doctor working as a GP or consultant.

This process of acquiring medical judgment is also known as ...

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Liability is driving out board-certified ER docs, allowing internal medicine physicians to benefit:

Ironically, he credits the state's years of high malpractice insurance premiums and fears of litigation with driving out the competition: board-certified emergency medicine physicians who, although they may live in Pennsylvania, commute across the river to work in New Jersey.

"As an ER doctor, I can make more money than I can as a hospitalist, more ...

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Cardiologists are excited about high-dose Crestor. Primary care physicians are more cautious. Does anyone know if Christopher Cannon gets contributions from AstraZeneca?

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