Here's something interesting I came across from Internal Medicine News Online. It discusses whether the media overplays and overpublicizes clinical studies. Some excerpts:

. . . most studies cannot stand alone. "Rarely is a study conclusive enough or broad enough to establish public policy or direct individual action by itself," . . .

. . . Although they might be suitable for journal publication, very few ...

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Medpundit and DB has chimed in on the mainstream coverage of the deficiencies of PSA screening for prostate cancer that was discussed here on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Medpundit writes:
Beware of organizations made up of hospitals and urologists who call for lower thresholds for treatment. They have much to gain from the increased number of biopsies such lower thresholds would produce. Unfortunately, it's far from clear ...

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The mainstream press has caught wind of the NEJM study that was discussed here yesterday. Here are some quotes from the article:

. . . "This study adds to information that perhaps the PSA threshold may be dropped to 2.5 or so," said Gomella, the Philadelphia urologist. "The number 4 may not be the, quote, normal that we look at anymore."

. . . Some ...

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In the May 27th issue of the NEJM, a study was released that concluded that biopsy-detected prostate cancer was not rare among men with PSA levels of 4 or less. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 15 percent of cases in the group with PSAs of less than 4, and of those cases, 15 percent were high grade.

This begs the question - should the threshold ...

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I came across this case from JAMA in January, 2004. Here are the basics:

1) A third-year resident, Dr. Merenstein, saw an educated 53-yo man for the first time at his resident clinic. A PSA level had never been done before.
2) A documented discussion about the risks and benefits of screening was done, and the patient was enouraged to consider the information. He was never ...

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Just noticed this headline as I was drinking my diet soda. I'll have to see the actual study myself to come to any conclusion, but here are the salient points from Reuters:

A team at Tata Memorial Hospital in India found a strong correlation between the rise in per capita consumption of carbonated soft drinks in the past 50 years and a documented increase in rates of esophageal ...

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A laparoscopic approach to colon cancer was initially explored in the early 1990's, but then abandoned due to questions regarding the efficacy for achieving appropriate resection. A recent study from the NEJM, did a controlled trial which concluded similar rates of cancer recurrance between open and laparoscopic resection.

Here is an excerpt from the accompanying editorial:
Approximately 250,000 colonic resections are performed each year in ...

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AMNews:
Smoking cessation success reported

Training nurses and medical assistants who register patients at primary care facilities to use specific, guideline-based methods to encourage smoking cessation increases the likelihood that patients will successfully quit, according to a study published in the April 21 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Researchers tested the effectiveness of guidelines developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in a randomized, controlled ...

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I'm flying soon, and thought this would be a relevant article to share.

Prescriber's Letter:
Practical Tips for Avoiding "Economy Class Syndrome"

What Is Economy Class Syndrome?

Economy class syndrome is a condition that can happen after sitting in a cramped space, such as the economy class section of an airplane. This can lead to blood clots in the legs and sometimes the ...

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AMNews:
Final data from WHI's estrogen-only arm published

Estrogen-only hormone therapy for postmenopausal women does not affect coronary heart disease but increases the risk of stroke by 39% while decreasing the risk of hip fracture by 39%, according to a study published in the April 7 Journal of the American Medical Association.

Therapy was also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, although this was not statistically ...

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