Boiling point: Two interns in India beat up their attending

A reader emails me the following commentary on medical experts in malpractice cases:

Although I'm only a med student, I know several med mal lawyers and have inside sources that work at a couple of these law firms. Anyways, one issue I think you should pursue is how medical experts work. I have a wife that works as an admin assistant for a med mal lawyer, and its very frustrating ...

Read more...

The LA Times writes about medical bloggers
"The family pictures on the desk. The diplomas on the wall. A few magazine subscriptions, perhaps, or some sailing, tennis or golf memorabilia scattered around the office. In the past, a curious patient could only turn to these bits of evidence to try to know more about the individual behind the medical degrees, the white coat and the carefully scripted bedside manner.


Read more...

Screwed both ways: Two doctors have to pay for the side effects of chronic systemic steroid treatment for an asthmatic
"Two area doctors must pay $1.9 million to an asthmatic patient whose bones were so badly damaged by being overmedicated with steroids that he needed both hips replaced by age 41, a Lackawanna County jury ruled Wednesday."

Chronic systemic steroids are not routinely used for most cases of asthma ...

Read more...

Hey Nick, nice soundbite on NBC Nightly News tonight
Nick Genes (Blogborygmi) was talking about his experience on the Alitalia flight that was diverted in May.

Why the Democrats caved on malpractice caps in Illinois
"It finally dawned on Democrat leaders that when people, even fellow Democrats back in the precincts, weigh the relative merits of doctors and lawyers, they come to rational conclusions. A lawyer can defend them in court, maybe win them some money in a lawsuit, but only if they're alive. And it takes a doctor to fix a failing heart or do ...

Read more...

An elderly lady with abdominal pain was seen twice and sent home, died of a missed small bowel obstruction
Sounds like a missed X-ray "wet read" by the ER physician: "Regardless of whether the X-rays were going to be subsequently reviewed by the radiology department, we think the miss on the part of Dr. -- was an obvious one and ought not to have happened. Ultimately, his incorrect reading ...

Read more...

20 warning signs that your physician might be an Al-Queda doctor

10 sneaky lawyer questions in malpractice cases - and how to respond

Mindnumbing: How Medicare fees are calculated
"To arrive at the spending target for 2006, for example, officials first looked at the target for 2005, which reflects the cumulative difference between actual expenditures and allowed expenditures for all years between 2005 and the base year of 1996.

Next, they calculated the 'sustainable growth rate' or SGR, which measures changes in four areas: physician fees (including lab fees and the ...

Read more...

Merck is trying to clean up its image
"The intent of the campaign, which is to continue through the end of the year, can be divined from its slogan: 'Merck. Where patients come first.'"

Someone gets it: Talking about "activist" medicine and how the US leads the world in it
"I define activist medicine as procedures, treatments, and consultations that have a low probability of affecting the outcome. The procedures and consultations are undertaken to rule out unlikely possibilities, to confirm diagnoses, to improve chances of success, and to reassure patients . . .

. . . I suspect the United States leads ...

Read more...

There is little incentive for obstetricians to back up home-birth midwives, because of the potential for malpractice suits
"Some midwives choose to forgo malpractice insurance, saying that their close relationship with clients makes it less likely that they will be sued."

How treating migrants may be crippling hospital care
"The federal law that put the hospitals on the hook for the medical bills of illegals goes by the acronym EMTALA--Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act. It says that anybody who shows up in an ER must get screened, treated and stabilized, regardless of citizenship or ability to pay.

But since its passage in 1985, the definition of emergency ...

Read more...

There simply aren't enough hours in the day for many family doctors to deliver high-quality care to people with chronic conditions
Thanks for the news flash. One helpful recommendation: "Ostbye's team set forth a number of suggestions to ameliorate the problem, including writing patient care guidelines with real-world conditions in mind.

'There is a lot to be said for having guidelines, but it seems they are often written ...

Read more...

Some want to take Viagra off the Medicaid and Medicare coverage list
"Left unchanged, Medicaid and Medicare will spend about $2 billion on sexual-enhancement drugs between 2006 and 2015, the Congressional Budget Office has estimated.

Taxpayers should pay for medically necessary drugs, not drugs that enhance people's sex lives - whether recipients are sex offenders or not."

Malpractice fears put doctors on defense
"When Geoffrey Blatt went to medical school, he was taught not to order unnecessary tests for his patients. Now, even some patients with headaches get brain scans.

'You're afraid of the one-in-10,000 patient that may have a brain tumor,' the Kansas City neurosurgeon said.

And afraid that the patient may sue for malpractice.

Defensive medicine like this has become standard operating ...

Read more...

retired doc's thoughts on the recent compensation figures
"Delta also provides current average locum tenens bill rate per 8 hour day and, of course, they show a similar ordinal ranking. But it gets worse. While the internist, FP and ped all make $760 per day, the CRNA brings in $1,140 and a hospitalist makes $975. An internist has to sub specialize to make more than an anesthesia nurse."


Read more...

Are rising malpractice premiums related to economic downturns and stock market losses?
"Trial lawyer advocates often repeat the silly assertion that medical malpractice premiums spiked in recent years because insurance companies had to recoup bad stock market investments. It's an argument refuted often enough before . . ." (via PointofLaw.com)

Over 90 percent of physicians admit to practicing defensive medicine
"A total of 824 physicians (65%) completed the survey. Nearly all (93%) reported practicing defensive medicine. 'Assurance behavior' such as ordering tests, performing diagnostic procedures, and referring patients for consultation, was very common (92%). Among practitioners of defensive medicine who detailed their most recent defensive act, 43% reported using imaging technology in clinically unnecessary circumstances. Avoidance of procedures and ...

Read more...

Most Popular

Join 147,000+ subscribers

Get the best of KevinMD in your inbox

Sign me up! It's free. 
close-link
✓ Join 148,000+ subscribers 
✓ Get KevinMD's 5 most popular stories
Subscribe. It's free.
close-image