"A new study shows . . .": The inadequacy of mainstream media reporting medical research. "Trouble is, as any frequent morning news show viewer can tell you, when reporting on what today's "new study shows," reporters routinely fail to provide viewers with much (or sometimes any) detail or context -- Who did the research/study? Who funded it? How large was the sample size? How does it compare to similar studies ...

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The American Cancer Society is hosting smoking cessation blogs. (via KidneyNotes)

A hospital settles despite multiple mammograms and ultrasounds for a breast lump. "Mrs Walker, now 53, first went to see her local GP in April 1999 after noticing a lump on her left breast.

Her doctor referred the mother-of-two to the Northern General Hospital where she underwent the standard triple test of a clinical examination, mammogram, and a fine needle biopsy.

She was given the all clear.


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A gynecologist is in trouble for attempting a tubal ligation without realizing the patient was pregnant. "The patient also told the gynaecologist she had been tested and was not pregnant and on that basis he decided to go ahead with the procedure.

The gynaecologist - known in the commissioner's report, which removes names, as Dr B - said he was under pressure to make a yes or no decision. ...

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A severely disabled woman wants to sue her mother's doctor for allowing her to be born. "The High Court is hearing a landmark case arising from a medical negligence claim brought by two children who were born severely disabled.

One of the so-called 'wrongful life' claims has been brought by Sydney woman Alexia Harriton, now aged 24.

When Alexia Harriton was born, she was not expected to ...

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Burnout: The average doctor in the Czech Republic can find themselves working up to 100 hours a week.

The Washington Governor to the doctors and lawyers - Cool off:

If I can get them to come together and leave their weapons at the door and have a real discussion about what we need to do here, I'm willing to convene such a meeting. But when you've got that much [animosity] built up, I don't know if now's the time to have a constructive conversation.

One-third of physicians may leave Medicare if reimbursement is cut. "The AMA has laid out the prospect of a major exodus of physicians from Medicare if Congress doesn't rescind or modify plans to cut Part B payments to physicians by 4.4% next January. And this time, said the AMA, it's serious.

AMA officers said today that they expect about a third of physicians to stop accepting new Medicare patients ...

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(via This Makes Me Sick)

Word to the wise: Never treat without an office visit. "An ambush can happen almost anywhere. I've been ambushed at the gas station, at the local coffee house, and outside the supermarket while trying to get two fussy daughters into the car. I've even been ambushed in the parking lot of my clinic by a patient who had an appointment to see me 20 minutes later.

The common factor ...

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This efficient doctor gets to the bottom-line:

If you're in primary care, it's important to realize where your profit comes from. In my case, it's not the little old ladies with hypertension and osteoporosis. Give me a new 13-year-old with a history of asthma and a bad sore throat and I'll give you a fully documented level 3 new patient visit and a rapid strep test that will generate more ...

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The dangers of refusing to settle malpractice cases. "Suppose you've been sued for malpractice, and your insurance carrier wants to settle the case rather than risk a big jury verdict. But you're convinced that your diagnosis and treatment were correct, and you're willing to take your chances with a trial. What are your options?"

The New Yorker talks medical malpractice:

There have been a number of studies showing that, the worse the outcome, the more likely a lawsuit is to happen. It's not necessarily closely tied to whether that outcome was the result of a clear mistake. Obstetrics is probably the most notable example of a field in which controversy over causation arises. For instance, it seems more and more likely that cerebral palsy ...

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MedSleuth talks about hospitals leaving "friendly" bacteria alone. "In an attempt to make hospitals more sterile, isn't it reasonable to think we have actually created an environment where deadlier bacteria are created in order to survive and infect patients? So why not allow some friendly bacteria to survive to see if it is possible to lessen the virulence of unfriendly bacterial strains by removing their incentive to mutate in an ...

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Lastest service to be outsourced: Doctor visits. "The Gonzaleses are members of a Blue Shield of California HMO that provides all of the family's nonemergency care in Mexico. They are among 20,000 California workers and their dependents in health plans that cost 40 to 50 percent less than comparable care in the United States because the doctor's visits are outsourced south of the border.

With health-care costs in the ...

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More confusion on the Medicare drug plan. "A.J. Kravtin was confused.

At a forum last week for Medicare's new prescription drug benefit, Kravtin sat among hundreds of other elderly people, listening to information on how to choose a drug plan.

At the end of the presentation, he still hadn't figured it out "” and he's a doctor."

Voters reject both malpractice initiatives in Washington.

Update -
Here are the numbers:
Initiative 330
Yes 443,102 47.69%
No 486,124 52.31%

Initiative 336
Yes 387,021 42.09%
No 532,472 57.91%

A woman is awared over 2 million dollars for salmonella poisoning at a Chinese restaurant. "Lord Hodge said she had suffered a 'permanent progressive disease' which resulted in pain and a loss of manual dexterity and she now relied on strong drugs to control the effects."

"This Makes Me Sick": A new medical malpractice blog. "ThisMakesMeSick answers renowned medical inventor Dr. Robert Fischell's wish to spread awareness (and outrage!) about the medical liability crisis that's ruining our healthcare system." (via PointofLaw.com)

Does antibacterial soap work better? Nope:

Studies show that more than 70 percent of liquid hand soaps sold are now labeled antibacterial, and Americans seem increasingly willing to pay a premium for them.

But the truth is that most consumers may not always be getting what they think they are. Over the years, studies have repeatedly shown that antibacterial soaps are no better than plain old soap and ...

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