. . . on a fertility case gone wrong due to a medical mix-up.

Some big changes in the coming months. First we're switching to an EMR. After that, there's the increasing pressure by management to see more patients - not to mention having our compensation structure more directly correlate with our productivity RVUs. I'm thinking of changing my schedule structure - currently it's the standard 15-minute blocks with 30-minute physicals. Many advocate the modified-wave structure. Looks good ...

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As you may have heard, the new NCEP cholesterol guidelines were released yesterday. The biggest change is a goal LDL of < 70 in the very high risk group. Now, what classifies as very high risk? They are the following:

Established CAD plus:
i) multiple major risk factors (esp. diabetes)
ii) severe and poorly controlled risk factors (i.e. continued smoking)
iii) multiple risk factors of ...

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As you may heard, in Lowell, MA this lady recently won the $294 million MegaMillions jackpot. Some psychologists say that the so-called sudden wealth syndrome often leads to impulse buying and social isolation.

Two views . . .

. . . on medical malpractice. One from the insurers' perspective, the other from the lawyers. These articles are from the state of Wyoming, where 1 of the 3 medical malpractice insurers withdraws from the state later this year.

. . . as a solution to alleviate the malpractice crisis. Some practices claim up to 80% of patients agree to the terms - namely waiving their right to a jury trial. Read more about it in Medical Economics.

Medrants and RangelMD have chimed in with their opinions on the piece regarding the patient who demanded ovarian-cancer screening. Each makes fantastic points.

Also, in response to BMC hiring a managment consultant, symtym supports the idea, while Blogborygmi takes a more cautious take.

Medpundit links to an excellent article detailing how more cancer screening isn't necessarily better. There certainly should be further public education on taking a more balanced, evidence-influenced view - or else more physicians would be subjected to this.

This story is getting a lot of play here. Here are the basics:

In short, the unsupervised pharmacy technician, in her second week on the job, wrongly added insulin to an undisclosed number of intravenous nutrient bags prescribed to sick infants.

The feeding bags contained no indication of insulin on their labels. They apparently were not checked by the pharmacist before delivery to the neonatal intensive ...

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Medrants has recently ranted about going to back to basics:

We need to return to first principles. The reason we became physicians was to care for people, not patients! By that I mean, caring for the patient, rather than the disease.

We need a revolution in our thinking. This revolution actually is occuring in retainer practices and cash only practices. Patients will, I believe, be willing to pay ...

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Nothing like reading an article about my old training ground, Boston Medical Center. Having the state's busiest emergency room gave them incentive to decrease waiting times, especially in light of the recent stories about other ER's in the state. They brought in a management consultant, and instituted some radical ideas. So far, seems pretty successful.

So, I saw a woman in her 40's this morning who demanded to be screened for ovarian cancer. Knowing that no governing body recommends this, I had a long discussion regarding the risks and benefits of screening for ovarian cancer. Then came the line: "It is my right to demand this test, if you won't, I'll sue the clinic". Nice. Thoughts of this story came ...

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. . . why we need universal health coverage. Sounds like beating a dead horse. This Boston Globe story just details how increasing numbers of hard-working families simple cannot afford insurance.



I still have several invites left. Send me any entertaining, medically-related story or article, and I'll give a Gmail invite to what I find interesting. I give preference to entries that are well-written.

Our third winning Gmail entry is a quirky story about an IUD of all things:

"After my marriage, things happened so fast. Before I could understand how to decorate ...

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. . . Having a busy workload and being in a technical medical specialty increase the odds that a physician will not follow hospital handwashing guidelines, new research suggests . . .

. . . Adherence with hand hygiene guidelines averaged 57 percent, with internists having the highest rate - 87 percent -- and anesthesiologists having the lowest - 23 percent.


Interesting new study on physician handwashing. ...

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So, this guy has been breaking hot dog eating records for the past 4 years. Today, he ate 53 1/2 hot dogs in 12 minutes to break his own world record. I've always wondered how one practices for something like this. Anyone have any predictions on what kind of health problems he's going to have in the future?

Today's NY Times discusses how insurance plans are no longer paying for recently changed to OTC medications - such as Claritin and Prilosec. With OTC statins on the horizon, I'd bet they can't wait to stop covering these medications. Imagine the savings.

Incredible story from today's USA Today. I wanted to blog about this earlier, but I've been on the road all day.

An ethics professor takes an interesting look at how elitist the US health care system is becoming. On one hand, we have concierge practices:

Now, one might wonder why it is necessary to pay a bounty to get a doctor to call you back, especially if you are already paying through the nose to belong to a managed care plan. The answer is that under the watchful eye ...

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What discounts?

It seems the effect of the Medicare drug discounts was simply higher drug prices. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

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