Less than 20 percent of doctors currently use electronic medical records.

One of the more cited reasons is that, in a fee-for-service payment system, doctors often lose money since the number of patients they see decreases during the long implementation phase.

Paying doctors by the hour will solve that problem. Consider this physician, who said "he had to give up his solo practice after he had ...

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Their recent editorial on electronic medical records is bang on, albeit a bit late, as their conclusions have been discussed on the medical blogs for the past year or so.

The NEJM study in March, showing a 1.5 percent hospital adoption rate for comprehensive digital records, probably finally persuaded them. They acknowledge that, even though money is the primary issue, cash alone won't solve the problem.


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President Obama has called for the nation's health care system to adopt electronic medical records "“ a move that he says will lead to 80 billion dollars in savings.

That figure comes from a theoretical study done in 2005. But analysts admit that real-world evidence doesn't support the claim. For one thing, 100 percent of physicians would have to adopt digital records, while at the moment less than 20 ...

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One oft-heard complaint is how difficult it is for patients to talk to an actual physician.

The reasons are myriad, but the main factor is that doctors are not reimbursed for e-mail and telephone communication with patients.

A group in California is going to find out how badly patients would like to use e-mail as a communication tool. For an annual fee of $60, patients get the ...

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New numbers have recently come out, highlighting how low the adoption rate is for electronic medical records in hospitals.

As reported by MedPage Today, the study from the NEJM found that only 1.5 percent of hospitals surveyed had comprehensive electronic medical record systems. That's a piss-poor adoption rate, and far lower than the dismal numbers in small office practices.

The reasons cited are no surprise to ...

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I'm afraid the answer is yes.

An op-ed in the Washingon Post criticizes the influx of federal dollars to fund the spread of the current generation of electronic medical records.

Much of the data supporting the improvements in patient safety and the supposed cost-savings were done in large, integrated health systems, such as the VA, Kaiser Permanente in California, or the Mayo Clinic.

Unfortunately, ...

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Well, they're going to give it a try.

In a somewhat audacious initiative, Wal-Mart is entering the digital medical records fray. They're proposing to bundle computers and equipment, along with a popular EMR program, to sell to doctors at an attractive price. They're probably hoping that bulk purchases with help with the pricing.

Will it work? It depends.

David Williams, although cautiously optimistic, ...

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Well, duh.

Many patient encounters, like those involving medication refills for instance, can be done without an office visit. An e-mail or telephone conversation would suffice in most cases. However, with Medicare and other private insurers refusing to reimburse for such claims, it is no wonder that many doctors insist on a face to face visit that gets reimbursed.

HMO Kaiser Permanente recently published a study ...

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One of the pillars of health care reform is modernizing our antiquated health records system.

That means pouring billions of dollars into the current generation of electronic medical records (EMRs), despite both the flaws, and the myriad of reasons why doctors are so resistant to go digital.

In an excellent piece, orthopedic surgeon Scott Haig points to why electronic records are not likely to save money, and worse, ...

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It's surprisingly frequent.

WhiteCoat notes a study from the Archives of Internal Medicine looking at how often doctors overrode drug interaction warnings that pop up when prescribing.

I can say, at least with the EMR that I use, that it's quite frequent, with warnings occurring when refilling medications that patients have been taking safely for years.

I'm not alone with this experience, as the ...

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