Tech

Electronic medical records worsen patient communication

Electronic medical records are becoming more prevalent in physician offices nationwide, but patient communication is being disrupted by the computer in the room.

An excellent piece by the New York Times’ Pauline Chen outlines the problem.

Calling it an “unforeseen consequence” — I quibble with whether this was truly unforeseen — Dr. Chen notes that, although electronic medical records promise efficiency, in reality, they hamper communication:

But that afternoon as I settled …

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VA information technology saves billions of dollars

by John Gever

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ long-term investment in healthcare information technology paid off at a rate of more than $500 million in net annual benefits from 2001 to 2007, researchers said.

That added up to more than $3 billion in benefits for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) during the study period, after an initial billion-dollar loss.

In particular, the department’s computerized patient record system “was the dominant contributor to …

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Paperwork prevents doctors from spending time with patients

Just how bad is paperwork for doctors?

In a recent New York Times piece, surgeon Pauline Chen gives us some stark numbers.

Paperwork takes up “as much as a third of a physician’s workday.” That’s a lot, and is coming at the expense of face to face time with patients.

Worse, look how it’s affecting medical residents.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that most residents spent as much as 6 hours …

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Real world meaningful use of health IT for physicians

by David C. Kibbe, MD, MBA

An article in the April 10, 2010 New York Times entitled “Doctors and Patients, Lost in Paperwork,” brought attention to what may be, in the near term, the Achilles heel of the plan to incentivize doctors for the “meaningful use of EHR technology.”

The article cited a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine this past February, which asked a large cohort of physicians in …

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Why healthcare may not embrace the iPad

The excitement and hype surrounding the announcement of Apple’s iPad have subsided for the time being, perhaps just a lull prior to the actual release in a few months. It’s expected that the iPad could make significant contributions to healthcare, such as potentially replacing the physician’s clipboard or medical textbooks.

However, we did disagree at times on the extent to which the iPad could penetrate the healthcare market, for a variety …

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The personal health record is failing patients

A personal health record (PHR) has been touted as a way for patients to better keep track of their health information. Google Health and Microsoft HealthVault lead the way.

But what happens if the company storing your data gets bought, goes bankrupt, or simply decides to discontinue their system?

Well, those who stored their data with Revolution Health are finding out first hand.

The troubled company, which started off with so much …

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EMR conversion doesn’t always help physician communication

by Stuart Sutton, MD

Our very large and very integrated health care system is plowing ahead with EMR implementation. All the offices are gradually converting from paper charts and all the hospitals have completed the process.

As a member of one of the last offices to be converted to the EMR, I’ve had the pleasure of patients being assured that the notes were sent to me (albeit via the EMR we are …

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Electronic medical records need to better focus on patients

The biggest problem with today’s push for electronic medical records is an archaic user interface.

Physician Alexander Friedman, writing a scathing essay in The Wall Street Journal, agrees.

Today’s electronic medical records are written for the benefit of insurance companies, which scrutinize each doctor’s note carefully for billing purposes. But, as Dr. Friedman astutely points out, “thorough, efficient billing doesn’t translate to better care.”

It’s gotten to a point where some …

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Smartphones and the future of wireless medicine

Eric Topol discusses the future of smartphones in health care and wireless medicine in this TEDMED 2009 lecture.

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Is Google Android or the iPhone the future of mobile smartphones?

by Felasfa Wodajo, MD

Over the last few months, a great deal of time has been expended on the “hot competition” between Apple and Google in relation to smart phones.

Much of this interest probably had to do with a partially imagined story of a once close friendship between Apple and Google, founded on their mutual enmity of Microsoft, now fractured on the rocks of competition and greed. While the truth probably …

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Electronic medical records need to be more intuitive for doctors

It’s commonly thought that the current generation of medical students are more technologically savvy, and thus, able to better utilize electronic medical record systems.

But an interesting study found that’s not always the case.

From the ACP Internist, almost 200 medical students were asked to use a mock-EMR during a patient encounter. Here’s what was found:

Students were scored on their ability to find information crucial to the patient’s case within …

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KevinMD on the Apple iPhone App Store, and optimized for mobile browsing

Mobile browsing represents the fastest growing segment of information consumption. And KevinMD.com will be there.

app-store-badge I’m pleased to announce the KevinMD.com App, now available on Apple’s App Store for your iPhone or iPod Touch.

Of course, the site is already optimized for viewing on your Android, Windows or Palm-based mobile browser.

And don’t forget, you can also follow the discussion on Read more…

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