When I was growing up in the 1970s, news was different, and this is not just the everything-was-better-in-my-day nostalgia. News was about news. News was not sexy. What has changed? Robert Reich's Supercapitalism, makes the answer obvious: competition. Interestingly, according to economic theories, competition is good for the consumer – it drives quality up and prices down. That may be true for toilet paper, but it has not panned out for ...

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by Chris Emery, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today A large number of U.S. medical schools say students have posted unprofessional material on Web sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter, but few schools have adequate policies in place for dealing with such behavior, a new study found. medpage-today Of 78 U.S. medical schools that responded to a survey, 60% reported incidents of ...

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Instead, the question should be, why shouldn't you? Kim McAllister, over at Better Health, gives some good reasons why health professionals should start a blog. But it shouldn't just be limited to blogging, but the entire spectrum of social media tools, which give health professionals a powerful way to engage both patients and colleagues. I recently gave a talk to the folks over at the New England Journal of Medicine, discussing ...

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I have been graciously invited to participate on a panel in the medical blogger track at Blog World Expo 2009, held in Las Vegas on Thursday, October 15th. blog-world-expo My panel, entitled, The State of the Health Blogosphere: We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby, will be moderated by Emergiblog's Kim McAllister. I am honored to be joined by Nick ...

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Blame motivated reasoning. Newsweek's Sharon Begley writes about the phenomenon, which goes a long way why the myth about "death panels" continues to persist in the health reform conversation. She cites the work of sociologist Steve Hoffman, who explains: "Rather than search rationally for information that either confirms or disconfirms a particular belief, people actually seek out information that confirms what they already believe." And with a growing majority obtaining their ...

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I've made several radio appearances recently, so here's your chance to listen to me, in case you can't get enough of the blog. health-in-30 A few weeks ago, I appeared on Barbara Ficarra's Health in 30 Radio Show talking about social media and medicine. Are doctors behind the curve when it comes to social media? Is the medical profession slow ...

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Journalism professor Gary Schwitzer is the foremost health media watchdog, with his organization rigorously monitoring the health content of major media. During the past year, he notes a disturbing trend. According to his analysis, the health segments on network television morning shows, "unquestioningly promote new drugs and new technologies, feed the 'worried well' by raising unrealistic expectations of unproven technologies that may produce more harm than good, fail to ...

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The Huffington Post is one of the most prominent, and fastest growing, news sites, and as pediatrician Rahul Parikh puts it, "one of the most valuable pieces of real estate on the Internet these days." They have a prominent health and wellness section, but as you can read from Dr. Parikh's piece, The Huffington Post is crazy about your health, readers be warned. As with their approach to other topics, The Huffington ...

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As more physicians are on social networking sites. that's an issue that some are grappling with. The NEJM has a nice perspective piece on the issue. After realizing that a recent friend request came from a former patient, Sachin Jain thinks about the ramifications. Dr. Jain writes that, "In confirming this patient as my "friend" on Facebook, I was merging my professional and personal lives. From my Facebook page, Ms. ...

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Twitter has captured the mainstream imagination, with celebrities and news organizations embracing the medium. Will Twitter soon be an essential tool for medical practices? Twitter is a social media service where users can communicate with one another in 140 characters or less. More doctors are using Twitter to connect both with patients and other medical professionals. Some hospitals have "live-Tweeted" surgery, to great fanfare, allowing the public a peek into the operating ...

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