It looks like The Huffington Post's honorary Medical Editor, Dr. Dean Ornish, walked into the same trap that Whole Foods CEO John Mackey did. Mackey got a lot of flack when he wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal on health care reform, one in which he emphasized the need for personal responsibility for our health. Ornish, in an effort to inject himself into the current debate, blogged, Don't Tread on ...

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How about a little of both? I don't see, for instance, why we can't have universal coverage and malpractice reform. In a similar vein, MIT's Jonathan Gruber writes a great op-ed in the Boston Globe recently, about controlling health spending. One one side, progressives generally want to reform the supply side spending of medical care, which means pressuring the payments made to doctors and hospitals. On the other, conservatives ...

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An article that appeared in the Los Angeles Times in late August looked at the idea that one of the keys to providing better medical care at lower costs may be house calls. Should we bring house calls back? There is some compelling data — like an in-home doctors’-visit program for Medicare patients at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center that cut the length of hospital stays and saved the hospital millions ...

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Here are the top posts from the past month, based on the number of times they were viewed. 1. Robert Ricketson and the surgical screwdriver medical malpractice case: The medical records revisited 2. Medical students want to become primary care doctors, until reality hits 3. AMA: A look at the facts on health reform 4. Michael Jackson dead from propofol, is Dr. Conrad Murray solely to blame? 5. The consequences ...

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The following op-ed was published on August 20th, 2009 in CNN.com. When President Obama recently cited the number of Americans without health insurance, he declared that, "We are not a nation that accepts nearly 46 million uninsured men, women, and children." Uninsured patients often delay preventive care, waiting to seek medical attention only when their conditions worsen. This leads to more intensive treatment, often in the emergency department or hospital where ...

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Prior to President Obama's address to Congress on health reform, I asked myself, "What would I tell the President?" First and foremost: go for it. All of it. Health care in America is too important, both economically and morally, to be left adrift in its current state. Its focus is wrong. It costs too much. And not everyone who needs it is able to have it. Two rules that have served me ...

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by Charles W. Patterson, MD Health care reform has long been one of my main interests and currently, it seems to be everyone else's. The President said he thought a single-payer system would be best, but submitted a proposal he thought could be passed. The outcome is in doubt. Actually, the single-payer system is the second best possible solution. The government would hold the money but would remain vulnerable to political manipulation, ...

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by Emily P. Walker, Washington Correspondent, MedPage Today In Wednesday's address to Congress and the nation, President Barack Obama made a number of statements about healthcare reform, some involving issues that would directly affect medical practice. MedPage Today examined five of Obama's statements to add context to the sound bytes. medpage-today The Statement: "I don't believe malpractice reform is a silver bullet, ...

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by J.E.B. Johnson, MD Dear President Obama: We agree that our health care system can use some improvement, but it is difficult to agree on how to accomplish this. It seems as if your desire for a major overhaul is far from certain. Some pundits have suggested this may emasculate your presidency, but I beg to differ on this point. This is not a failure of policy as much as it is ...

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by Robert Berry, MD In his column, David Brooks of The New York Times effectively compares our rapidly rising health care costs to “a stampede of big ugly rhinos.” What he ignores, however, is the huge elephant in the room that is largely responsible for this rhino stampede – the tax preference for employer-based health insurance. This tax preference – enjoyed primarily by employees of large businesses and government at ...

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