When Michael Howard arrived for a checkup with his lung specialist, he was worried about how his body would cope with the heat and humidity of a Boston summer. “I lived in Florida for 14 years, and I moved back because the humidity was just too much,” Howard told pulmonologist Dr. Mary Rice as he settled into an exam room chair at a Beth Israel Deaconess HealthCare clinic. Howard, 57, has chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

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Something like one in seven people living in the U.S. have no health care insurance. In fact, the number of uninsured people has grown by 7 million since 2016. These numbers are atrocious. Embarrassing. Shameful, actually, in a country as wealthy as ours. We need to recommit ourselves to guaranteeing people access to affordable health care insurance.

And then we need to go one step ...

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Another emergency physician asked me what I think will happen if the “surprise bill reform” with a benchmark fix happens.  I told her privately, but I am sharing, so everyone can understand why I am working so furiously on a seemingly boring and crass issue of reimbursement.  I do believe that patients should be taken out of the middle and shouldn’t ...

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Although pediatric (children's) hospitals are not yet mandated (as are their general population counterparts) to participate in value-based contracts (VBCs), as competitive medical institutions they are very cognizant of the market changes toward value-based payment models while tirelessly seeking to increase value in pediatric health care delivery. The push towards better alignment of payers and hospital systems continues to change the landscape of competitive health care. Children's hospitals "are the backbone ...

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The monumental shift in health care from fee-for-service or a volume-based approach to value-based care will change health care delivery for the better in the United States.  When physicians do what is necessary and avoid over-testing and procedures of limited or no value, the outcomes are best for the patient, and for the entire health care system. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have tested and continue to test models ...

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You think you are medically insured. A few days later, you receive a hospital bill worth thousands of dollars in your mailbox. Your insurer denied coverage, claiming you sought an "inappropriate" or "unnecessarily" emergency care. The question here is, "Who has the exclusive opinion in America to deem signs and symptoms necessary for an ER visit?" — "Is it me as an individual feeling endangered or my health care insurer?" If this ...

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When a patient seeks the care of a professional, they expect that person to be well trained, experienced, and constantly continuing their education. As an ophthalmologist, I completed a 4-year undergraduate program at Virginia Commonwealth University, 4 years of medical school training at The University of North Texas Health Science Center, a year of a rotating internship, and a 3-year residency program in ophthalmology at Tulsa Regional Medical ...

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An excerpt from Physician Employment Contracts, The Missing Module: A comprehensive introduction to physician agreements written for doctors. Professional liability or “malpractice” insurance protects a physician and the employer from claims related to the negligent practice of medicine. Two common types of professional liability coverage carried by major insurance companies are “claims-made” ...

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Can you let things roll off your shoulders? Are you the tough, no-nonsense, tell-it-like-it-is, stand-your-ground type? Do you show up to work no matter what? Has no one ever seen you cry at work? Are these things resilience? We nurses openly divulge the issues that make us leave the bedside, even amid a vast shortage of nurses. Professional organizations report these issues, and academic, and research institutes aggregate data for a convenient ...

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I would like to explore a typical American health care experience through a different lens: energy. Upon entering a hospital, I would see bright lighting and hear the gentle hum from ventilation. If I were to get an MRI, this requires significant energy often supported by fossil fuels. For blood work, there would be medical waste generated from my stick. While grabbing a quick bite to eat in the hospital cafeteria, ...

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