Originally published in MedPage Today by Todd Neale, MedPage Today Staff Writer Primary care physicians who took part in a continuing medical education program emphasizing reflection about their clinical experiences reported improvements in burnout and mood, researchers found. medpage-today The participants also indicated positive changes in empathy and psychosocial beliefs, suggesting a more patient-centered approach to care, according to Michael Krasner, MD, ...

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Plenty, if you ask the people most familiar with the situation, the emergency physicians themselves. According to a survey from Emergency Physicians Monthly , many tests performed in the ER are deemed unnecessary to good patient care. Here's how doctors responded to the following question: "Given that in a typical shift of eight hours you see an average of two patients per hour (16 patients/shift), could you have eliminated ...

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Paul Levy is the CEO of Boston's Beth-Israel Deaconess hospital, and one of the nation's foremost patient safety advocates. He blogs at Running a hospital, where he openly talks about the various issues facing a major academic institution. Increasing transparency, such as shining a light on medical errors and hospital infection rates for instance, can provide an effective way to confront each of these issues, so patients can benefit. Better ...

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Here's a simple chart that sums it all up. Apologies for the small type. defensive medicine As The Happy Hospitalist writes, "Some doctors and patients may be willing to experience some anxiety for the unknown. But most won't, especially since neither party is directly paying for the testing. This selfish interest is rooted in moral hazard, at the expense of ...

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by Michael Kirsch, MD The concept of medical excess is very difficult for ordinary patients to grasp. The medical community has worked hard for decades teaching them that more medicine meant better medical care. The public has learned these lessons well. Physicians who sent their patients for various diagnostic tests or specialty consultations were regarded as conscientious and thorough. Patients approved of doctors who prescribed antibiotics regularly for colds and other ...

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I am on record saying that some elements of tort reform will be passed by Congress. The most likely reform will be safe harbor immunity for following physician-developed practice guidelines. We believe this is a start. A more robust approach would include qualified immunity for those who consciously deviate from such guidelines because in a specific clinical circumstance, it makes good clinical sense for patients. This balance would keep doctors from ...

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by Mark N. Simon, MD What can hospital medical staff leaders learn from University of Oregon football coach Chip Kelly? In the morning of September 4th, Kelly had an opportunity to review video tape from the conclusion of his team’s game with Boise State University the night before. What he saw was his senior running back LeGarrette Blount punch an opponent and then lose his cool with the fans ...

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by Emily P. Walker, Washington Correspondent, MedPage Today The White House today announced details of a $25 million grant program to test alternatives to the tort system for medical liability cases. medpage-today In his Sept. 9 speech before Congress, the president announced he would direct Kathleen Sebelius, Health and Human Services secretary, to launch pilot programs meant to cut down on physicians ...

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Not necessarily. That's the finding from a recent study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. What the researchers did was simulate three scenarios of medical mistakes, "a year-long delay in noticing a malignant-looking lesion on a mammogram, a chemotherapy overdose 10 times the intended amount and a slow response to pages by a pediatric surgeon for a patient who eventually codes and is rushed to emergency surgery." Varying degrees of physician ...

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It depends if you see the glass half empty or full. I've written on several occasions that there is little evidence that preventive medicine saves money, despite what some politicians say or believe. A recent study from Health Affairs provides more clarity, as it related to the long-term implications of diabetes. There are two decidedly different takes on the article. First, according to The New York Times' Prescriptions, it ...

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