I spent the entire day in meetings today. One would think that is a boring or unproductive way for a physician to spend time, however these meetings made me proud to be a doctor and proud of my colleagues in medicine. The morning was spent with nurses, respiratory therapists and quality experts who came together to celebrate success with patient safety and quality initiatives that have saved at least 151 patient ...

Read more...

Originally published in HCPLive.com by Jeff Brown, MD One area we need to look at is the surprisingly high costs of hiring and firing people who work with us. And as always, I rebuke our training programs for their ostrich-like attitudes, ignoring how important managerial and organizational competence is to the quality of medicine that we practice. We know that recruiting a ...

Read more...

My latest USA Today column was published this morning: Any malpractice reforms should put patients first. I discuss how the our medical malpractice system poorly compensates injured patients and is ineffective at improving medical practice. These are the most important reasons why malpractice reform is needed. And capping awards is not the answer:

Researchers found that the impact of frivolous lawsuits ...

Read more...

Originally published in HCPLive.com by Alan Berkenwald, MD William Osler is known as the Father of American Medicine. He was a world class physician, the “Doctor’s Doctor” - as physicians all along the Atlantic seaboard would sent their family members to him. He wrote the first American medical textbook. He was so good, he was recruited from Johns Hopkins (which he had turned ...

Read more...

Originally published in Journal Watch Emergency Medicine by Richard D. Zane, MD, FAAEM Nearly 30% of ED boarders at a single tertiary care hospital experienced undesirable events. Emergency department boarding — inpatients in the ED awaiting a hospital bed assignment — is common across the U.S. Although boarding is inconvenient and demoralizing for both patients and providers, few studies have examined outcomes of boarding. In ...

Read more...

Dr. Paul Grundy is on a mission -- a mission to promote the patient-centered medical home model that he has been instrumental in developing and rolling out, in his dual role as Director of Healthcare, Technology and Strategic initiatives for IBM Global Wellbeing Services and Health Benefits, and President of the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative. I had the opportunity to speak with him last month (here's the transcript and ...

Read more...

When the elderly go to the emergency room, more often than not, they are admitted to the hospital. Stuart Turkewitz, a geriatrician posting at his platintiff attorney brother's malpractice law blog, explains why. Often times, it's because emergency doctors aren't familiar with the baseline state of his elderly patients. Subsequently, "the urge to recommend admission is overwhelming," and the "attending physician often at the other end of the phone, ...

Read more...

There's a disturbing case in Texas, involving two whistle-blowing nurses who reported a physician to the Texas Medical Board (TMB). Apparently, they took offense at the physician who was peddling herbal medications in the emergency room, among other deeds. Unable to convince hospital administration to discipline him, they reported him to the Board. And here's where it gets disturbing. Angered by the action, the physician then filed a criminal complaint, ...

Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by John Gever, MedPage Today Senior Editor Many African-Americans in California enrolled in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) appear to prefer getting medical treatment in emergency rooms, researchers said. One-quarter of African-Americans enrolled in Kaiser Permanente or other commercial HMOs in California, who would therefore have a range of treatment options, sought treatment in emergency rooms in 2007, ...

Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by Todd Neale, MedPage Today Staff Writer Rapid viral diagnostic testing did not reduce the burden of treating children with respiratory symptoms and fever in the emergency department, according to a Cochrane Review meta-analysis. Pooling the results of four trials, researchers found a significant reduction in the use of chest radiography (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.65 to ...

Read more...

Most Popular

Join 147,000+ subscribers

Get the best of KevinMD in your inbox

Sign me up! It's free. 
close-link
✓ Join 148,000+ subscribers 
✓ Get KevinMD's 5 most popular stories
Subscribe. It's free.
close-image