An excerpt from Alone and Invisible No More: How Grassroots Community Action and 21st Century Technologies Can Empower Elders to Stay in Their Homes and Lead Healthier, Happier Lives (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2011). by Allan S. Teel, MD Whenever I engage in a detailed discussion about our core mission of helping elders remain in their own homes, invariably the conversa­tion turns to liability. "Aren’t you ...

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According to Wikipedia, up to the beginning of the 19th century there had been only 3 occupations that were considered to be professions, Divinity, Medicine and Law. A profession is considered a trade or occupation that transforms itself through "the development of formal qualifications based upon education, apprenticeship, and examinations, the emergence of regulatory bodies with powers to admit, discipline members, and enforce adherence to an ethical code of practice." Professionals are ...

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Part-maverick, part-unconventional, part-smart business owner Sir Richard Branson has business lessons to share in spades. Since I recently read his third autobiographical book Business Stripped Bare: Adventures of a Global Entrepreneur, I wanted to pass on some of what I learned from the book. Without knowing exactly why, I have long admired his acumen and chutzpah. His story has provided me insights into why I've been so drawn to his adventures in ...

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It was a beautiful Monday morning in May. Yawning uncontrollably, I hopped into a Ford Hybrid with my attending and drove off to visit a patient who lived two hours away from our hospital. I woke up especially early that morning since we knew the commute would take many hours. We drove past open fields and a few cows before pulling into a driveway of a lovely house with a cute ...

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by Larry Cohen When Florida Governor Rick Scott recently signed legislation barring doctors from asking about gun safety practices in the homes of their child patients, it sounded the alarm that physicians’ roles in community prevention are chronically misunderstood. Rather than restricting doctors’ options for involvement in prevention, we should be supporting and expanding them. Community prevention is the creation of physical and social environments that ...

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by W. Gregory Feero, MD, PhD The 10-year anniversary of the publication of the sequence of the human genome offers primary care physicians a look into how they can incorporate genomic advances into clinical care in the next decade. The National Institutes of Health celebrated the 10th anniversary of the publication of the sequence of the human genome and the subsequent remarkable burst of scientific and clinical ...

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There is no question that bank failure, credit problems, and other issues create a situation where people find it necessary to make payments in cash, only. While you will never need to worry about this money clearing for payment, it is still important to be aware of some of the risks associated with taking cash payments.  In most cases, once you address these issues, you ...

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It’s well known that there is a shortage of primary care physicians which is only going to get worse over time. To address this problem, Dr. Peter Bach, the director of the Center for Health Policy and Outcomes at Memorial Sloan-Kettering and Dr. Robert Kocher, a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, propose making medical school free. They argue that medical students would be more likely to choose primary ...

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Dr. Lewis didn’t sleep last night. All day he stood, heavy in full surgical scrub with a human heart in his hands, replacing damaged valves and calcified arteries until the heart beat on its own again. After he finished, there were a few hours before the transplant to get some dinner, to call home. The heart came on a helicopter. A young man, a bad accident, a perfect heart. Dr. Lewis pierced ...

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Although the medical profession has been harming unlucky patients for centuries, the patient safety movement didn’t take flight until 1999, when the Institute of Medicine published its seminal report, To Err is Human. And that report would have ended up as just another doorstop if not for its estimate that 44,000-98,000 Americans each year die from medical mistakes, the equivalent of a jumbo jet crashing each day. Come ...

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