by Crystal Phend Poor compliance with breastfeeding recommendations costs the nation at least $13 billion each year, with nearly all of the cost related to infant morbidity and mortality, according to a comprehensive economic analysis. If 90% of new mothers followed guidelines for six months of exclusive breastfeeding for their children, an estimated 911 deaths would be prevented annually, said authors Melissa Bartick, MD, MSc, of Harvard Medical School, and Arnold Reinhold, ...

Read more...

When physicians choose to leave clinical medicine to pursue alternative careers, what motivates them to make such changes? Is it money? More time with family? Scheduling flexibility? Avoiding litigation? To pursue new challenges? Maybe you're getting bored with medicine. Depending on that key motivating factor, physicians end up choosing all types of career paths. For instance, let's take a look at some of these motivators: Money. Let's face it. Some physicians love ...

Read more...

by Michael Smith The use of treatment checklists for 13 common diagnoses was associated with a dramatic reduction in patient deaths at three London hospitals, researchers said. The year the checklists were introduced, the three facilities in the North West London Hospitals NHS Trust registered 255 fewer deaths than the previous year, according to Brian Jarman, PhD, of Imperial College London, and colleagues. The targeted diagnoses accounted for 174 fewer deaths than the ...

Read more...

It's well documented on this blog that the primary care shortage will only worsen once most of America has access to affordable health insurance. As I wrote in a recent op-ed. not only will there a shortage of primary care physicians, but nurse practitioners and physician assistants won't alleviate the problem either, mostly because they are also enticed by the lucrative allure of specialty practice. Enter the three-year primary care physician. Texas ...

Read more...

It has been three months since I closed the door on my primary care office for the last time. It was with a heavy heart that I said goodbye to the many patients I cared for over the last six years. I am the fourth physician to leave the practice in as many years. As the economy faltered, I found my private office practice had simply become unsustainable. With the popularity ...

Read more...

by Rick Bendinger, MD I am a rural health provider in Abbeville, Alabama and have been here almost 30 years. I originally went to school on a public health scholarship and took the private practice option. This was a program that existed in the 1980s that paid for tuition and a stipend with the obligation to go either to a prison, rural area, or Indian reservation. Sadly the program no longer exists. ...

Read more...

I've written previously that the days of the private practice physician are numbered. A detailed piece from the New York Times confirms the exodus. Young doctors, who are burdened with medical school debt exceeding $150,000 are opting for the financial stability that a salary from a hospital-owned practice, or a large integrative medical center, can bring. Gone are the days where a solo practitioner can hang a shingle and ...

Read more...

by Michael Smith Healthcare workers in a New York City emergency department had the highest rate of infection among employees of an urban hospital system during the first wave of the H1N1 pandemic flu, researchers said. In a single-institution study using medical and administrative records, the adult emergency department had an H1N1 infection rate of 28.8% during April, May, and June of 2009, according to Robert Bristow, MD, and colleagues at New ...

Read more...

by Kristina Fiore Twenty-somethings rely on emergency departments (EDs) for care far more than do other age groups, researchers have found. In 2006, nearly a quarter of all young adult healthcare visits -- 22.1% -- took place at an ED, compared with 12.6% for children and adolescents and 8.3% for patients over 30. That rate has significantly increased over a 10-year period, Robert J. Fortuna, MD, MPH, of the University of Rochester Medical ...

Read more...

Beginning in the 1970s, the house call began a slow death. As the medical-industrial complex (MIC) burgeoned, with bigger hospitals and a surfeit of technology, it became incumbent on patients to come see us rather than us going to see you. Yet there are pockets of house calls still left in the U.S. For the geriatric age group, there has been growth in the care-at-home sector, especially for homebound elders. They can ...

Read more...

Most Popular

Get KevinMD's 5 most popular stories.