Originally published in Insidermedicine Three distinct types of drugs that affect mental processes can increase the risk of falling when taken by adults over 60, according to research published in the latest edition of the Archives of Internal Medicine. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Originally posted in Insidermedicine Identification and treatment of individuals with high LDL or "bad" cholesterol has improved in recent years, but patients are still slipping through the cracks, according to a survey published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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My position on the H1N1 flu vaccine is clear: everyone should get it. But not every physician shares that sentiment. The Washington Post reports that there are a minority who are unconvinced of the vaccine's safety and believe the H1N1 pandemic is over-hyped. Worse, they aren't vaccinating their patients. And when you're talking about pediatricians, that can mean trouble for their patients; children who are most susceptible to the ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Peggy Peck, MedPage Today Executive Editor By a margin of 0.014 mm in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), extended-release niacin (Niaspan) demonstrated superiority over ezetimibe (Zetia) as an add-on for high risk patients on long term statin therapy. But is a difference of 0.014 mm clinically significant? The niacin versus ezetimibe findings come from the ARBITER 6-HALTS trial, ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Emily P. Walker, MedPage Today Washington Correspondent Drug and device makers are urging the FDA to establish clear guidelines that will allow the industry to discuss and promote products in the unsettled world of online social media. The FDA is hearing testimony from drug and device companies, online marketing experts, and consumer groups about what steps ...

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At the American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, the results of the ARBITER 6-HALTS study were released. No Vytorin was used in the study, but I am sure that all the headlines will mention Vytorin. The actual study published ahead of press online in the New England Journal of Medicine. Essentially, they enrolled over 200 patients from Walter Reed and Washington Adventist who had known heart disease or were at ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Peggy Peck, MedPage Today Executive Editor Boosting HDL cholesterol with extended-release niacin (Niaspan) is a more effective way of slowing atherosclerosis in high-risk patients on long-term statin therapy than seeking additional LDL cholesterol reductions by adding ezetimibe (Zetia), researchers here reported. Compared with ezetimibe, 2 grams of niacin led to significant reductions in both the mean ...

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by Kairol Rosenthal I am a young adult cancer patient who waited five and a half hours for the H1N1 vaccination along with 1200 other Chicagoans in a city college hallway. I do not have the trained eye of a public health analyst, yet it was easy to spy the glaring flaws that occurred in the whimsical distribution of this short supply vaccine. One of these oversights was the absence ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine The best method for taking insulin among individuals with type 2 diabetes has been identified in research published in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Originally published in Insidermedicine Second-generation antipsychotic drugs can produce unwanted weight gain and other metabolic effects among children and youths after only a few weeks, according to research published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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