Originally published in HCPLive.com by Victor G. Dostrow, MD The Internet is filled with reports of remarkable cognitive enhancement with various nostrums. Many are not regulated, and the pages are typically associated with glowing testimonials and a link to sign up for uninterrupted (and uninterruptible) delivery of the miracle substance. More to the point of this post, other blogs, reports, and forum comments opine as to notable benefits of taking prescription medications marketed ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Todd Neale, MedPage Today Staff Writer Individuals using standard spoons from their home kitchen to dispense liquid medications may be pouring too little or too much of the drugs, researchers found. Among volunteers trying to pour a teaspoonful of cold and cough medicine, using a slightly larger spoon resulted in underdosing and using a much larger ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine The benefits of antidepressant therapy increase with the severity of underlying depression, according to a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future. That famous observation from baseball great Yogi Berra applies in spades to medicine. What technological advance or new insight will shape the next few years? As Yogi noted, it's tough to predict: It could be -- as Leif Ellisen, MD, PhD, thinks -- tumor genotyping.
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How did osteopenia, the precursor to osteoprosis, come about? Fascinating story from NPR, detailing how a drug company popularized the condition in order to expand the market for their drug, Fosamax. Osteopenia is diagnosed via a bone density study showing a "T-score" between -1.0 and -2.5. But how that definition came about was quite arbitrary. In 1994, a group of researchers from the World Health Organization poured over data, and eventually, ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Peggy Peck, MedPage Today Executive Editor "What we did for patients with acute MI was place them in a cool, dark place. Give them morphine for pain and lidocaine to prevent arrhythmias and hope for the best." The speaker is Steven Nissen, MD, director of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. He is describing standard care 25 ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine Healthy adults require only a single dose of H1N1 vaccine in order to be optimally protected, according to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Originally posted in MedPage Today by Nancy Walsh, MedPage Today Contributing Writer Hormonal contraceptives have a variety of noncontraceptive uses, ranging from common problems such as dysmenorrhea to severe conditions such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, according to a new practice bulletin from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). "Combined hormonal contraceptives can correct menstrual irregularities resulting from oligo-ovulation or anovulation and ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Katrina Woznicki, MedPage Today Contributing Writer Hospitalized patients were often clueless when asked about their medications, with almost all of them unable to name all their medications and many leaving out as many as a half-dozen drugs they have been prescribed, according to a small survey of patients in a Colorado hospital. Ninety-six percent of the ...

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A recent article from Newsweek discusses some of the long-term benefits of vaccines. But it's a section on the rich nation-poor nation dichotomy towards vaccine safety that's most fascinating. The authors observe that better educated nations are those with the most vigorous opposition to vaccines. The United States, for instance, has many who simply refuse to be given the H1N1 vaccine - a benefit that's not available to many ...

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