Originally published in MedPage Today by John Fauber, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MedPage Today Reporter When looking for a doctor to travel the country to promote its prescription fish oil product, a leading pharmaceutical company looked to a small-town community doctor rather than an academic heavyweight. Its choice was a Delafield, Wis., primary care physician and clinical lipidologist who entered private practice in 2001. For speaking ...

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Oxycontin is an oral pain medication that contains the single active ingredient oxycodone. Oxycodone is one of the most potent of the oral opiates, and has more euphoric effect than many other opiate analgesics. Oxycontin is the most notorious prescription drug of abuse in the US, and for good reason. Though marketed as a sustained release medication, as much as 30% of the medication is absorbed immediately and the rest absorbed ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Kristina Fiore, MedPage Today Staff Writer Earlier this year, Harvard's Partners Healthcare put a cap on payments its physicians can receive for serving on corporate boards at $5,000 a day. Although the cap primarily affects top researchers and executives, it is by far the stiffest limit imposed by any academic medical center, and drives deeper the ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Kristina Fiore, MedPage Today Staff Writer Even though 90% of parents believe vaccines protect their children against disease, many are also concerned about potential adverse effects, a new survey found. More than half of survey respondents said they were concerned about vaccine safety profiles, particularly for newer immunizations, Gary L. Freed, MD, MPH, of the University ...

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Avandia continues to dominate cardiovascular-related news this week. Recently, the AHA and the ACC issued a highly detailed, thoughtful, though perhaps slightly over-diplomatic science advisory on TZDs and CV risk. Taking a completely opposite tack, GSK, in no mood to take prisoners, and apparently about to nominate itself for a Nobel Prize, issued a 30 page White Paper in response to the Senate report published on Saturday. At the core ...

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A recent story from the UK reported a school child who developed diarrhea and tested positive for C difficile. The alarming thing is that there did not seem to be any explicit risk factors for this. The appalling thing is the mis-information by the story that, "children rarely become ill with C diff, which normally strikes elderly people in hospital." This is how things used to be, before the BI/NAP1/027 bug evolved ...

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Carolyn Riley’s act of giving her daughter Rebecca an overdose of prescribed medication may have been the immediate cause of Rebecca’s death, the conclusion reached by the jury that convicted her of murder. Even if, as the prosecutor argued, Carolyn and her husband concocted symptoms of mental illness and the psychiatrist, who diagnosed bipolar disorder, was a gullible enabler, the real guilty party in this story is, in my opinion, ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today An immediate-release form of the antidiabetic agent metformin has a dead fish odor that may cause patients to stop taking the drug, clinicians warned. Metformin is known to cause adverse gastrointestinal effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flatulence, distention, and abdominal pain. Those side effects "often necessitate discontinuing the drug," a group of physicians and pharmacists ...

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Originally published in HCPLive.com In January, New Jersey became the 14th state in the nation to legalize marijuana use for certain chronic illnesses. Other states where the use of medical marijuana is permitted include Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington; around a dozen more states are weighing pending bills. The New Jersey ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by John Gever, MedPage Today Senior Editor Herbal medicines are not always the harmless nostrums that many patients and even some physicians think, but may actually contribute to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, researchers warned in a review covering 44 years of research into the subject. Many such products, including aloe vera, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, and green tea, can ...

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