Whether you’re hoping to become the first doctor in your family or you hail from a long line of physicians, navigating the path to medical school can be a daunting experience that takes years of preparation. Providing a peek inside the mind of an admissions officer, associate dean of admissions, Karen M. Murray, MD from New York Medical College answers questions about what the best applicants all have ...

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I recently told a friend that medical school is changing me fundamentally as a person. This sounds dramatic, but there's truth to it. This program and education are successfully training my brain to think in new ways, sloughing off parts of who I was, and adding new parts to who I will become. However, to my surprise, the experience has also resurfaced old parts of me that I had considered ...

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I still remember the feeling of my first few days of medical school. Walking the halls felt like a giant, very real step towards a career that I had dreamt of pursuing for years. While I knew that academic excellence was table stakes, what I did not think about at the time was how important the other the parts of my life would be to my success. From my current vantage ...

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A little background before I set off:  I study in a medical school in India whose attached public hospital is as busy as it can get. It serves its people absolutely free of cost and is often a refuge for the poor of the society. We often run out of resources, and patients outnumbering the beds is a common sight. And yet, like everything else, life and medicine must go ...

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The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) should be abolished. This single test — which ranks students by the science they've learned before going to medical school — prevents the physician population in the U.S. from looking like the population it serves. Underrepresented minority students have lower scores on all standardized tests. And the MCAT is no exception. When medical school admission committees use the MCAT as a screening tool to ...

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"90 percent of what you will learn over the next four years will be wrong in a couple of decades from now." Speaking to a lecture hall of 120 first-year medical students, our professor's prophecy seemed to fall on deaf ears. Looking around, I saw no concerned students, no diminishment of our collective enthusiasm. For me, however, his words of caution struck a chord on that first day of medical school. As ...

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STAT_Logo Students’ time in medical school should help them grow and become insightful, caring doctors. Instead, medical education is somehow turning smart, gifted, enthusiastic applicants into exhausted and unhappy students who become interns, residents, and physicians at increased risk of depression and burnout. I’m no stranger to the demands of medical school. My father and father-in-law were both ...

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Job shadowing is a long-standing tradition.  High schools often have dedicated shadowing days, during which students can come and spend time with people working in careers that the students find interesting.  While a few hours isn’t really enough to know if you like, love or hate a job, it’s a start. In health care, it can be especially important to spend time shadowing.  In fact, PA schools want applicants to have ...

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Interleveling strategy

  • Interleveling is the process of studying/learning multiple unrelated concepts across different subjects during the same study session.
  • This can make studying appear difficult and more disjointed. However, research shows it yields better exam results. This is attributed to better simulation of the exam environment as questions are presented in random order, and concepts are scattered throughout the test.
  • A literature review rated interleveling as having ...

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The attending physician looked concerned. My fellow medical student’s face was wet with tears. I knew the next words out of the attending’s mouth would be “Are you OK?” and indeed they were. I have encountered this phrase many times, almost exclusively in psychologically traumatic situations.  It’s a reflex response to an uncomfortable social situation, the “right” thing to say to a student in distress. As medical students, we learn and practice the ...

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