The following is part of a series of original guest columns by the American College of Physicians. by Steven Weinberger, MD, FACP In December 2008 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its report entitled “Resident Duty Hours: Enhancing Sleep, Supervision, and Safety,” in which it proposed a number of changes to the current regulations developed and enforced by the ...

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Currently, the most important test prospective medical students take is the Medical College Admission Test, or MCAT. Despite what schools say, an MCAT score holds tremendous weight, more so than a brilliant essay or a stellar recommendation letter. In an interesting New York Times piece, Pauline Chen wonders whether that score itself leads to a great physician. She discusses an article showing that students' cognitive traits may be equally important. Although students ...

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Early last year, my boss Talmadge King and I were at an ABIM meeting (we’re both on the board), and the group was debating a controversial topic. Another participant at the meeting, like Talmadge the chair of a prominent department of medicine, said, “We polled 250 people at our grand rounds last week, and they said ‘X’.” The audience gasped – ‘X’ was a completely unexpected ...

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The following is part of a series of original guest columns by the American College of Physicians. by Steven Weinberger, MD, FACP At times of calendar transitions, e.g., at the onset of a new year or a new decade, the popular press often takes a broad view in looking retrospectively at the outstanding or defining events and people of the past ...

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It's no secret that without a stronger primary care foundation, the current reform efforts are unlikely to be successful. If anything, it will only delay the inevitable. I wrote last month that one discussed solution, adding more residency slots, won't help: it would simply perpetuate the disproportionate specialist:primary care ratio. A recent op-ed in The New York Times expands on that theme. The authors suggest that not only does ...

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Originally posted in MedPage Today by Kristina Fiore, MedPage Today Staff Writer Medical students are frequently stuck by needles, and few report their accidents, researchers say. In a survey, about 60% of surgery residents reported being stuck with a needle while they were in medical school, Martin A. Makary, MD, MPH, of Johns Hopkins, and colleagues reported in the December issue of ...

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Among the many differences between the U.S. and the French health-care systems is the approach to medical training. While U.S. medical school graduates in 2008 had an average debt of $154,000, French medical students receive their training virtually for free. For example, first-year medical students at the Faculte de Medecine Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris have only one mandatory cost for this year: an enrollment fee of $264. The amount ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine The posting of unprofessional and inappropriate content online by medical students is a relatively common occurrence that medical schools are going to have to learn to deal with, according to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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by Crystal Phend, MedPage Today Senior Staff Writer Limiting surgical residents' work hours has compromised both surgical education and patient safety, according to an analysis concluding that an 80-hour work week isn't enough. The maximum 80-work week imposed in the U.S. for residents is too little to provide mastery in surgery, Gretchen Purcell Jackson, MD, PhD, and John L. Tarpley, MD, ...

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"Don't go to the hospital in July." That's the prevailing public perception, since that's when new resident-physicians begin their hospital training. And indeed, there have been studies from Australia and England showing a higher rate of death and adverse events during this time. But what about in the United States? Recent data isn't so conclusive. A piece from American Medical News points to a recent study from the Journal of the American ...

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