We recently discussed the plight of young medical faculty.  It appears that their plight is even worse than we imagined. Recently, an abstract was presented at the Annual  Conference on Research in Medical Education at the Annual Meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges, in a session entitled, "Your Career is More than Your Specialty." The authors described a large survey, of over 5000 faculty at 26 US nationally representative ...

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I just finished another inpatient service stretch at our community hospital with some great cases and lots of good medicine.  While attending rounds may have changed a lot in the last 40 years as highlighted in a recent Annals of Internal Medicine article, some things have not changed – the focus on medical student presentations during attending rounds. Students spend hours through their call nights preparing for the visit ...

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Adapted from Generation Earn: The Young Professional’s Guide to Spending, Investing, and Giving Back. by Kimberly Palmer Young professionals today aren’t exactly known for our financial expertise. Dubbed "generation debt," we’re stereotyped as over-spending shopaholics, easily enticed by credit cards, lattes, and the latest smartphone. But that reputation, it turns out, isn’t fair. Yes, we have more student loan debt than previous generations, and average credit card debt among twenty-five- to thirty-four-year-olds ...

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What makes your doctor’s education unique from that of other health care providers? Recently, I was sitting in on a lecture by one of my favorite physician-teachers (certainly my favorite neurologist).  I’ll call him Dr. Deeds (for his resemblance to a character from the movie, Mr. Deeds).  He was giving a sort of broad, generalized lecture to prepare us for a series of lectures on neurodegenerative diseases ...

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They say you never forget your first "real" patient.  Mine was a woman who didn't need a pelvic exam, but who got one anyway. Next door, minutes later, my second patient provided another personal first: a male genital and rectal exam, also, without need. Medical students like me begin training by practicing the basics on one another–listening to heart sounds, and looking into each other’s ears and eyes—but eventually, every clinician-in-training must lay ...

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We were taught in grammar school that plagiarism is wrong. It is stealing someone else's property. Imagine in high school asking your mother to buy you "Cliff Notes" so you can copy it word for word. Mother would not have liked that, and it wouldn't have been right. To write an essay today, you'll probably start with a search engine. Instantly, Mr. Google delivers many intelligent commentaries on anything, probably better than ...

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by Nicholas J. Rohrhoff Each generation of physicians has no choice but to take on the responsibility of learning the science of medicine - how best to care for patients.  But current circumstances dictate that we must also bear the burden of developing policy that creates the best system in which to provide that care. Creation of a 21st century American healthcare system will require engagement and ...

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by Timothy Dempsey Looking in the mirror before heading out the door for my first patient encounter, I slouched. Something looked off. I had on my new, absurdly short white coat complemented nicely by the equally as new black stethoscope draped around my neck; yet the way I looked wasn’t the problem. It was the way I felt. No matter how well I dressed the part ...

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The following is a brief list of some of the things I think have been useful and worth their money in my first two years of med school: 1. Large, widescreen computer monitor. The volume of information required to internalize during the preclinical years of medical school can’t be compiled and organized on paper. You would end up with bookshelves filled with those gigantic 4″ binders. Therefore, almost everything happens on ...

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by Tayson DeLengocky, DO There has been a growing public interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in recent years. Osteopathic manipulative therapy, a form of physical manipulation of the body for improvement of health and body function, has been designated as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). According to data reported in 2007 by the National Institutes of Health’s ...

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