Interview season is upon us, and with the excitement of those dings from ERAS comes twenty tons of added stresses. Being in the new age of lightning speed communication via phones, tablets, laptops, etc., we no longer have use for invitations via snail mail. For obvious reasons, this makes for a much more effective process. However, giving thousands of high-strung Type A applicants the ability to respond to an invite ...

Read more...

Robots read EKGs. Computers interpret chest X-rays. Algorithms decide which treatment a patient gets. I asked myself this question this morning, "What job can I do as a doctor that cannot be done by a computer or a robot?" And one of the first things I said to myself was, "Comfort a human." But I dwelt on this for a moment and found it’s not quite true. Because computers and robots can ...

Read more...

Let’s conduct an experiment. Ask a baby boomer, say someone over the age of 60, about the landing on the moon in 1969. You can count on an emphatic response with people recounting the memorable moment when the moment was televised. The reverence, admiration and utmost respect for the NASA’s scientists and astronauts is practically palpable. NASA, considered the pinnacle of scientific innovation at the time, practically glowed with a ...

Read more...

More than two years ago, I wrote about some of the obstacles -- as well as the opportunities -- that introverted medical students face during training. Now that I have many rotations under my belt, it’s time for an update about my experiences on rotations, along with some helpful advice to newcomers. The challenges First, the challenges: Medical school rotations are very fast-paced, and our team members (co-workers and superiors) ...

Read more...

As a male medical student, I have developed a growing interest in and enthusiasm for recent efforts to raise awareness about workforce gender disparities in medicine. Though women comprise over 45 percent of resident physicians and 50 percent of medical students in the United States, research reveals deficits in key surrogate measures of successful integration. There are pay and promotion gaps, and women are much ...

Read more...

Breathing is different when you know what your lungs look like.  I first realized this during a meditation session at Stanford’s Windhover building. The space -- a large, subdivided room -- is a self-described sanctuary in the heart of campus. The walls are mostly glass, broken up by long, clay-colored steel beams. Natural light, filtered through the surrounding trees, streams in to illuminate five larger-than-life paintings -- a series called “The ...

Read more...

"Please walk slowly," cautioned Sunita, my interpreter, as I crept down the stony switchback trail towards the rural Nepali village of Dhulikhel. Sunita, in her petite navy ballet flats, hopped down the rocks as easily as the speckled goats grazing nearby. Emboldened by her speed, I stepped along eagerly, only to catch my size-ten neon running sneaker on a root and splat face-first into the dust. Looking up, I saw four ...

Read more...

The patient is a 27-year-old Caucasian woman: slender, well-groomed. She is sitting in the office of her urologist, and she is unconsciously twisting her hands as she interrupts the doctor, having finally worked up the nerve. "I know you told me to expect some pain for a while after the lithotripsy. But I've been having pain in my bladder, even when I don't think there are any stones. It started two ...

Read more...

A resident suffering from depression drinks too much and sleeps through a hospital shift the next morning. Another resident walks out of a patient room in the midst of a panic attack. As family medicine educators, how do we best handle these health concerns in our residents? The pendulum in medical training can swing in two directions. At one end, residents are indoctrinated into a macho mentality, where the need for self-care ...

Read more...

It is early on a Saturday morning when I walk out of the elevator of Doan Hall looking for a nursing desk to call the fourth-year anesthesiology resident I am supposed to be shadowing. Instead, I am met with a set of double doors and a staff-only sign. Before walking through the doors, I decided to read the placard placed on the wall next to them. As I begin to read, ...

Read more...

126 Pages

Most Popular