I wrote a few months ago that MRI suites can be the most germ-infested room in the hospital.

Now, comes another precaution patients have to consider prior to undergoing an MRI.

MedPage Today reports on a recent FDA announcement, warning patients to remove medication patches, like the fentanyl or nicotine transdermal systems, prior to having an MRI.

"Some patches contain small amounts of aluminum or other ...

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Jade Goody is 27-year old British reality TV star who is dying from cervical cancer.

As part of an ongoing reality show, her last days will be filmed and broadcast.

In this day and age of the Pap smear, cervical cancer should be all but eradicated. And Ms. Goody did have Pap smears. Several, in fact. However, as gynecologist Margaret Polaneczky observes, she ignored letters ...

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Doctors should realize the stress that patients undergo while waiting for test results.

Surgeon Jeffrey Parks discusses a recent study examining the issue, showing that a woman's "stress hormone levels were just as high during the waiting period as levels determined in women who were told the biopsy was positive for cancer."

A needle breast biopsy should not take longer than two days for a result, although ...

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Men of any age can present with the symptoms of low testosterone - including erectile dysfunction, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, decreased muscle mass and bone density. Is it safe to treat these symptoms with testosterone replacement therapy?

There are several ways to treat men with low testosterone: the most common are gels, patches, and injections. These treatments are effective for relieving symptoms, and are generally safe.

There ...

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Despite the fact that proton beam therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is expensive, and its efficacy questionable, that didn't stop local journalists from writing a puff piece touting its impending arrival in central Ohio.

Journalism professor Gary Schwitzer, however, takes them to task. He questions an advertisement in a local newspaper, and wonders why cost isn't mentioned, nor any discussion of the benefits versus risks.


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Medical imaging is one of the largest drivers of health care spending.

In a recent NY Times piece, Gina Kolata points to the fact 20 to 50 percent of scans ordered are not necessary. Indeed, as health reformers like to point out vis-a-vis the Dartmouth Atlas study, more care isn't necessarily better.

In fact, it can lead to worse outcomes, as these scans can point to ...

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Have you ever wondered why doctors have to perform a digital rectal exam?

Well, look no further, as primary care doctor Rob Lamberts gives us the answers discerning readers demand.

Simply by looking at the rectum, which by the way, indeed "takes some getting used to," can lead to significant diagnostic findings. Furthermore, does tight sphincter tone matter? And should you be worried about the large hands ...

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A recent, albeit retrospective, study suggests a correlation.

MedPage Today reports on a recent JAMA study that looked at patients who had an acute coronary syndrome. It found that those who took both a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), like omeprazole, Nexium or Protonix, with Plavix had a 25 percent increased risk of death or rehospitalization.

If true, that's a pretty significant finding, especially since PPIs are ...

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How bad did this doctor want to avoid the emergency room?

Freakonomics' blogger Steven Levitt recounts a story told by his physician-grandfather.

The 80-something year old started having symptoms consistent with a stroke. Instead of calling 911, or finding a way to an emergency room, he "called in a prescription to the drugstore around the corner for some clot-busting drugs and sent my grandmother to the ...

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According to a recent study looking at the Medicare population, the answer appears to be yes.

MedPage Today
reports a study showing that elderly white patients had colon cancer screening rates ranging from 39 to 47 percent, compared to 29 to 38 percent in blacks and 23 to 33 percent in Hispanics.

First off, all those rates are dismally low. There should be no reason that ...

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