A few weeks ago, I cited a case where a urologist failed to follow-up on a deadly cancer found on a pre-operative chest x-ray.

Jeffrey Parks takes exception to my opinion, and instead, wonders why the radiologist shouldn't shoulder some of the follow-up responsibility.

"For some reason radiologists are immune to the usual expectations of physician responsibility," writes Dr. Parks. "It must be nice to just ...

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The following op-ed was published on April 23rd, 2009 in the USA Today. As a primary care doctor, it's heartening to hear President Obama call for "the largest investment ever in preventive care." That means more people, for one, will be undergoing tests to screen for various forms of cancer. But this might be one of those cases where what sounds like common sense is actually more ...

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My latest USA Today op-ed was published this morning.

I talk about controversies surrounding prostate and breast cancer screening, and how common sense doesn't always apply when it comes to early cancer detection.

Here's the bottom line: "Persuasive arguments can be made for and against screening, and the decision is a highly personal one. But patients must be better informed of the potential consequences either choice can ...

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A simple, potentially cost-effective screening test to detect infant heart defects is rarely used in hospitals today.

Darshak Sanghavi, the chief of pediatric cardiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, is calling for a simple pulse oximetry test to screen infants for heart defects.

He cites a study showing that the test can detect 75 percent of critical heart defects that would have been previously missed. ...

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Those with atrial fibrillation often have to take blood thinners, like warfarin, to reduce the risk of stroke.

The problem is, warfarin requires close monitoring as well as some dietary restrictions to maintain its effectiveness and reduce the very real risk of side effects, like bleeding. It can be a significant disruption in a patient's life, requiring regular trips to a anticoagulation clinic to have blood drawn for ...

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It appears the days of the Pap smear may be numbered.

A recent study from the NEJM showed that a DNA test outperformed the Pap smear in reducing deaths from cervical cancer.

This has tremendous implications worldwide, where cervical cancer continues to be a significant cause of death. Not only is the DNA test effective, it's also inexpensive, costing around $5.

Pap smears take ...

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With Provigil going generic in 2012, Cephalon is looking to replace that lost revenue.

Enter Nuvigil.

The drug company is trying to add a new indication, that is, "curing" jet lag, to give it a leg up over its predecessor.

That, and also drastically hiking the price of Provigil, may entice doctors to make the switch to the newer medication prior to patent expiration.

But, ...

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Ever see softball pitchers do their big, windmill windup prior to a pitch?

MedPage Today
finds a small study shows that it may strain their anterior shoulders more than an overhand throw.

Softball pitchers, who underwent photographic motion analysis and surface electromyography analysis of their biceps, were found to have an increased risk of injury to their biceps, caused by increased "peak biceps brachii muscle activation during ...

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Amy Tuteur's father tragically passed away, but could it have been prevented?

She recounts the story, where, after presenting coughing up blood, her father was then diagnosed with lung cancer. However, 7 months earlier, that mass was seen on a pre-operative chest x-ray.

The urologist who ordered the test failed to inform her father, and he was later sued, but was found not to be liable.


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Screening for prostate cancer has become controversial.

The US Preventive Services Task Force concludes that the evidence is insufficient to fully endorse prostate cancer screening in younger men and they recommend against screening for prostate cancer in men over the age of 75.

And a recent study from the National Institutes of Health found that, after 7 to 10 years of follow-up, screening men with a prostate specific ...

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