More patients are expecting doctors to be more like Gregory House, the fictional doctor of Fox's House, M.D. But when you consider how much unnecessary testing is already going on, can this be a good idea? house md Well, no. But that doesn't stop a handful of patients with rare diseases to implore that their doctors do more testing: "Doctors say ...

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The following is part of a series of original guest columns by the American College of Physicians. by Steven Weinberger, MD, FACP In the Fall of 2009, we physicians should perhaps change the Biblical phrase, “Physician, heal thyself” to “Physician, immunize thyself” and then follow the phrase twice – once for seasonal influenza and once for H1N1. To date, physicians and other health care workers have too often been lax ...

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Originally posted in Insidermedicine Nurses are as well protected from influenza with a standard surgical mask as with an N95 respirator while caring for febrile patients, according to a randomized trial published in the November 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. insidermedicinelogo Here are some guidelines for infection control among hospital patients with confirmed or suspected H1N1 ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent Men who were in utero during the peak of the 1918-1919 flu pandemic were at increased risk of heart disease when they reached their 60s, 70s, and 80s, researchers said. medpage-today In those men, the rate of heart disease was more than 23% higher than among those whose mothers ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Todd Neale, MedPage Today Staff Writer Men might not be getting the information they need to make an educated decision about prostate cancer screening, two new studies suggest. medpage-today Among 375 men surveyed by telephone, only 69.9% had discussed a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test with their physician before making a decision about screening, according to the ...

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The doctor-patient relationship must remain the central focus of good health care. Diminish or hinder that relationship, and no technological advance, funding system, or government intervention in the world will be able to compensate. Many complaints about present health care systems can be seen as evidence of relationship dysfunction, not in the least due to the interference of third parties, administrators, payers and insurers, who wield the financial clout. Transparency ...

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Originally published in Journal Watch Infectious Diseases by Stephen G. Baum, MD Since the emergence of this virus in spring 2009, the number of infections has remained uncharacteristically high, presaging a bad winter for influenza. journal watch logo The first cases of influenza A (H1N1) in the U.S. were identified in April 2009. By August 30, at least 1 million cases ...

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A recent issue in The Lancet included an article entitled “The Death of Ivan Ilyich and pain relief at the end of life.” This is a thought provoking article focused on the question of whether there is overuse of pharmaceuticals to treat various forms of suffering in hospice and palliative medicine. The authors argue that a good death, as seen through their interpretation of The Death of Ivan Ilyich, may include ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Chris Emery, MedPage Today Contributing Writer Prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests may lead to unnecessary treatment of healthy men for prostate cancer, and there is little evidence supporting the common but controversial test for routine cancer screening, two new studies found. medpage-today Measurements of blood concentrations of PSA failed to predict cancer with the accuracy generally ...

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It's been shown that flu shots reduce the spread and severity of influenza. But despite CDC guidelines recommending that all health care professionals receive both the seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine, a significant number of physicians and nurses plan to decline the shots. Data from the CDC show that only 40 percent of health care workers receive the seasonal flu vaccine. Reasons include fear of side effects, including the perception ...

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