Originally published in Insidermedicine Implanting a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is no better at saving lives than simply providing optimal medical therapy for individuals who suffer damage to the heart from a heart attack, according to research published in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by Todd Neale, MedPage Today Staff Writer Here's a case where texting may actually improve a teenager's health: Text message reminders appear to be effective in getting young liver transplant patients to take their immunosuppressive medications, a small study showed. In 41 patients with a median age of 15, there was a significant improvement in medication compliance ...

Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by Todd Neale, MedPage Today Staff Writer Most patients who underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory failure survived their struggle with pandemic H1N1 flu, according to a study by researchers from Australia and New Zealand. Of the 68 patients treated with ECMO during the Southern Hemisphere's winter, 54 were still alive as of Sept. 7, according to ...

Read more...

by Phil Sefton Writers and editors rushing to meet deadlines know the feeling. The effects of stress, a few too many cups of coffee, and perhaps a candy bar or bag of chips in place of a meal can conspire to make the most steely-nerved wordsmith feel a tad nauseated. Or is it nauseous? And what of that stress, that coffee, that ill-chosen meal replacement—are its effects nauseating or nauseous? Grammarians with ...

Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent The winter wave of the pandemic H1N1 flu hit intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand hard, researchers said, and may offer lessons for doctors bracing for the pandemic's return to the Northern Hemisphere. All told, 722 people with confirmed pandemic flu were admitted to one of the ...

Read more...

Dating advice from an oncologist

How do you know if a couple is right for each other? Watch how they interact in a cancer clinic. So says this oncologist in a poignant column from the Boston Globe. As Robin Schoenthaler writes, "When you’re a single woman picturing the guy of your dreams, what matters a heck of lot more than how he handles a kayak is how he handles things when you’re sick. And one ...

Read more...

Originally published in Journal Watch Emergency Medicine by Richard D. Zane, MD, FAAEM Repeat chest CT angiography scans have a low yield for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Computed tomography (CT) angiography of the chest is considered the definitive test for pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department. Although CT angiography is readily available, it exposes patients to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast dye (JW ...

Read more...

Findings released in late September showed potential benefits of an investigational HIV vaccine. 16,000 people were involved in the three-year study. Roughly half received the vaccine, and the others received a placebo. 74 participants in the placebo group got infected with HIV, compared with 54 in the vaccinated group. The results suggested that the vaccine was 31 percent effective, and were deemed statistically significant. The National Institutes of ...

Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by Ed Susman, MedPage Today Contributing Writer Cruising down the highway in a sleek convertible, with the wind blowing in your hair, may sound like the ideal road trip -- but it could harm your hearing, British scientists said. medpage-today In a study conducted on the high-speed motorways of the U.K., doctors found that at highway speeds, ...

Read more...

Originally published in MedPage Today by Crystal Phend, MedPage Today Senior Staff Writer Plumes of virus-laden air shooting out from the masks of patients undergoing noninvasive ventilation could put healthcare workers at increased risk for infectious diseases such as the pandemic H1N1 (swine) flu, researchers said. medpage-today A positive-pressure ventilation mask on a simulated patient yielded a jet of exhaled air extending ...

Read more...

Join 145,000+ subscribers

Get the best of KevinMD in your inbox

Sign me up! It's free. 
close-link
✓ Join 145,000+ subscribers 
✓ Get KevinMD's 5 most popular stories
Subscribe. It's free.
close-image