Originally published in Insidermedicine Sodium intake has a direct and independent impact on the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, according to a meta-analysis published online ahead of print in the British Medical Journal. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Will the H1N1 flu virus mutate?

Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent The CDC is keeping a careful eye on a mutation in some strains of the pandemic H1N1 flu that Norwegian researchers isolated from three patients with severe disease. The mutation has been seen "sporadically" in the U.S., according to Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization ...

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When it comes to terminal disease, experimental therapies can be a patient's last hope. Should physicians try to bend the entry criteria of clinical studies to include these often desperate patients? A recent study from the University of Massachusetts medical school revealed that 90 percent of physicians would ignore the entry guidelines for a study if they felt that it would benefit the patient. The New York Times cited examples ranging from "altering ...

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by Jeoffry B.Gordon, MD, MPH The recent recommendation of the US Preventive Services Task Force against routine screening mammograms for healthy, low risk women under the age of fifty has demonstrated our broad consensus about the value of breast cancer screening. The discussions about new guidance from the American Academy of Obstetrics and Gynecology on when to start and how often to do PAP smears illuminate the impact, effectiveness and support ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Emily P. Walker, MedPage Today Washington Correspondent The emotional debate over a federal panel's proposal to end routine mammograms for women in their 40s has reignited controversy over a contentious healthcare reform issue: comparative effectiveness research. Healthcare reform opponents say the new mammogram guidelines by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) make their point: If ...

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The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) has just revised their guidelines for Pap smears under some pressure. This resulted from an Annals of Internal Medicine article which documented that only 16.4% of gynecologists followed the College’s prior guidelines. Most did more screenings than indicated, the worst record of the specialties tested. But the ACOG still recommends that nearly all women obtain regular screening at intervals of 1-3 years. The ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent In the first six months of the H1N1 flu pandemic, 22 million Americans fell ill from the virus, the CDC now estimates. Of those, about 98,000 needed inpatient care, and 3,900 died, according to Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. The estimates ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine Daily text messages sent to individuals' cells phones can help remind them to use sunscreen, according to research published in the latest issue of the Archives of Dermatology. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Originally published in MedPage Today by Charles Bankhead, MedPage Today Staff Writer Women can wait longer for their first Pap smear and then repeat the test less frequently, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). The organization now says women should begin cervical cancer screening with a Pap test at age 21. Subsequent tests should occur at ...

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Doctors have understood for some time that it was inevitable. The American Cancer Society has acknowledged that cancer screening has been oversold. It seems like every day you read in the newspaper that what was standard medical care yesterday is now no longer recommended. Don't doctors know anything? Well, actually they do. And what seems like paradoxical behavior, no longer recommending aggressive screening for certain cancers, actually represents a more sophisticated ...

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