Originally posted in MedPage Today by Crystal Phend, MedPage Today Senior Staff Writer The end of the so-called second wave of pandemic H1N1 influenza may be in sight as testing rates -- and the number of positive tests for the virus -- show evidence of decline across the country, a report affirmed. From their peak in late October, diagnostic H1N1 testing rates ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Chris Emery, MedPage Today Contributing Writer Asthmatic smokers who quit the habit can reverse lung damage that exacerbates their breathing difficulties, regardless of how long and how often they smoked in the past, a Dutch study found. The lungs of asthmatics who stopped smoking were in similar condition to those of asthmatics who never smoked, based ...

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The fallout from the mammogram screening guidelines have served as a test case, of sorts, to see how the politicians and public will respond to recommendations based on evidence-based clinical practice. And, judging from the inflammatory reaction, it's safe to say that we're quite a ways from medical decisions based on the best available data. In a recent editorial, the New York Times touched upon the issue. One of the Senate's ...

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Whenever I order a mammogram for a woman in her 40’s, I also give her a warning: “Don’t get scared if it’s abnormal.” I tell her this because research shows that a woman who undergoes 10 routine screening mammograms has a 50-50 chance of having something unusual that requires her to go for more tests. The vast majority of these mammographic abnormalities aren’t cancer, but she still needs to get ...

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Originally posted in HCPLive.com by Colleen O’Leary, RN, MSN, AOCNS I have always been very intrigued by the various forms of radiation therapy and used to relish the day that I would take my basic oncology class to the radiation oncology department for a tour. I learned something every time. But now, with the advent of new technology and the trend for facilities to advertise that they have the biggest and best ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine Inhaling pure oxygen at a fast rate can reduce or even eliminate the pain of cluster headaches, according to a study published in the December 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. classid='clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000' codebase='http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=7,0,0,0' WIDTH='385' HEIGHT='239' id='play_continuous_flvs'> ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent Bad boys grow up to be sick men, researchers say. In a long-running British study of juvenile delinquency in boys, death and disability at age 48 were strongly linked to antisocial behavior in youth, according to Jonathan Shepherd, PhD, of Cardiff University in Wales, and colleagues. The imbalances in mortality and disability ...

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by Michael Kirsch, MD Who says one person can’t make a difference? This past week, I personally set back health care reform. No, I wasn’t attending a ‘tea party’ or decrying Obamacare in a venomous letter to the editor. I single-handedly bent the health care cost curve in the wrong direction. I performed an unnecessary medical test on a hospitalized patient, which exposed her to risk and cost the system money. ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Charles Bankhead, MedPage Today Staff Writer Constipation may represent one of the earliest signs of Parkinson's disease, preceding the onset of motor symptoms by two decades or more, data from a case-control study suggest. Patients with Parkinson's disease were more than twice as likely to report a history of constipation compared with a control population. The ...

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It's official. America hates fat people. Human beings are constantly searching for socially sanctioned reasons to feel superior to others and in 2009, those who are thin feel mighty superior to those who are not. How else could a college dare to make body mass index (BMI) a graduation requirement? According to James DeBoy, the chair of Lincoln's Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the point of the new policy is ...

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