It's been shown that flu shots reduce the spread and severity of influenza. But despite CDC guidelines recommending that all health care professionals receive both the seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine, a significant number of physicians and nurses plan to decline the shots. Data from the CDC show that only 40 percent of health care workers receive the seasonal flu vaccine. Reasons include fear of side effects, including the perception ...

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by an anonymous NICU nurse There is a medical controversy brewing over in England that is threatening to invade the United States. Ms. Capewell, a 23-year old British mother, is claiming English doctors let her 21 5/7 week infant die, only because they were following national perinatal guidelines. If only he was born at 22 weeks, she insists, they would have tried everything to save him and admitted him to the ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent In unpublished data, Canadian researchers have suggested that seasonal flu vaccination may increase the risk of catching the H1N1 pandemic strain, but such a pattern has not been found in the U.S., the CDC said. medpage-today The Canadian data appear to suggest that people who had been vaccinated against ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent For the first time, an investigational HIV vaccine has shown it can protect people from the virus. medpage-today In a large phase III trial, the vaccine candidate reduced the risk of infection by 31.2% compared with placebo. The trial, conducted in more than 16,000 volunteers in Thailand, enrolled volunteers from ...

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by an anonymous radiologist I recently read the article and comments on this link from this post, concerning radiologists, from Musings of a Dinosaur. I was disturbed to discover the animosity with which this topic is covered. The tenor of the blog is that radiologists are greedy, self-serving and are out to erode the doctor-patient relationship. The suggestion that radiologists would schedule percutaneous breast biopsies for their financial enhancement is both ...

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"Psychiatrists may be the last batch of physicians who are still granted a luxurious amount of time with patients." So says Maria, a psychiatrist who blogs over at intueri. And because time is so undervalued without our health system, some doctors relying on psychiatrists to counsel patients in the hospital. She cites an example with surgeons, saying that "it is entirely unfair to both the patient and the psychiatrist for the ...

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It happens over and over. I call a surgeon about a patient with abdominal pain. ‘Well, what’s the white count?’ ‘Normal.’ ‘Did you get a CT Scan?’ ‘Yes, and it was normal. But they just look uncomfortable.’ ‘Sounds like nothing for me to do. Call the hospitalist.’ It happens in other specialties. Cardiologists who aren’t interested in a patient with a normal stress test, pediatricians unimpressed with negative chest x-rays and normal labs. ENT’s unconcerned if ...

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by Mark Adelman, MD While diseases like prostate cancer and heart disease have become household concerns, abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), the 10th leading cause of death in men age 55 and older, have been overshadowed by more prominent diseases for far too long. It’s time we pull back the curtain and take a closer look at this serious disease and how it can be both detected and prevented. An AAA, which ...

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by Todd Neale, Staff Writer, MedPage Today Flu appears to act as a trigger for myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death, a review of the literature showed. medpage-today All observational studies included in the review found an association between times when influenza viruses were circulating and increases in cardiovascular death, according to Charlotte Warren-Gash, MBChB, of University College London, and colleagues. There was ...

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by Michael Smith, North American Correspondent, MedPage Today A minimum of 3.4 million doses of vaccine against H1N1 pandemic flu will be available in the first week of October, the CDC said. medpage-today Those doses -- all in the form of a live attenuated nasal spray vaccine -- may be supplemented by some injectable vaccine, according to Jay Butler, MD, the ...

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