Originally published in Insidermedicine Nearly half of women who undergo surgery and other treatments for breast cancer report having persistent pain in and around the treatment area a year or more later, probably because of nerve damage, according to research published in the November 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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by Kristina Fiore, MedPage Today Staff Writer Rhode Island Hospital, located in Providence, will pay $150,000 and install video cameras in all of its operating rooms after performing its fifth wrong-site surgery since 2007, according to the state's Department of Health. The hospital will also have to open its ORs to an inspector who will observe surgical procedures and protocols for at ...

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How do people with dementia die?

Originally published in HCPLive.com by Victor G. Dostrow, MD Dementia is a terminal illness. However, people with advanced dementias often languish in skilled nursing facilities, far from the ministrations of specialists. And, with reasonable luck, they have directives that specify that they are not to be taken to the hospital in the event of a respiratory arrest. Consequently, most of us are not privy to the mechanisms of demise in such situations.
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Originally published in MedPage Today by Kristina Fiore, MedPage Today Staff Writer Expectant mothers may enjoy listening to their unborn babies' heartbeats, but they shouldn't rely on home fetal heart monitors to provide an accurate picture of fetal health, researchers say. The devices may provide false reassurance in some situations, according to Abhijoy Chakladar, MD, of Princess Royal Hospital in West Sussex, ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine H1N1 flu can cause serious illness, resulting in hospitalization and even death among individuals of all ages, according to surveillance information coming out of California that was published in the November 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Here are the top posts from the past month, based on the number of times they were viewed. 1. Two nurses face jail time for reporting a doctor to the Texas Medical Board 2. Why pregnant women should get the H1N1 flu vaccine 3. Why doctors should choose Google Android over the iPhone for medical apps 4. What having the H1N1 flu feels like 5. Flu and H1N1 influenza vaccine ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent Vaccination does not appear to cause autism or other health problems in children with inborn errors of metabolism, a researcher said here. In a retrospective analysis, children with such conditions were not more likely than normal children to visit emergency rooms or need hospital care after vaccination, according to ...

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There are many tragic questions emerging from today's massacre at Fort Hood.  The one I'm interested in is why a reportedly mild-mannered psychiatrist, a specialist in disaster and preventive psychiatry no less, would make the decision to open fire on his fellow soldiers. Nidal-Malik-Hasan-fort-hood One reason may be so-called compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious traumatization or secondary traumatization. According to the Psychiatric ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Charles Bankhead, MedPage Today Staff Writer Clostridium difficile infection has spread from the hospital to the community but has proved manageable thus far. From 1991 to 2005, the incidence of community-acquired C. difficile in Olmsted County, Minn., quadrupled but still remained less common than the hospital-acquired gastrointestinal infection, Sahil Khanna, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent Children appear to shed particles of the H1N1 pandemic flu virus longer than adults do, which may have implications for how long they stay out of school, a researcher said here. The finding comes from an analysis of an outbreak in a Pennsylvania elementary school in May and June, ...

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