Originally published in Insidermedicine Daily text messages sent to individuals' cells phones can help remind them to use sunscreen, according to research published in the latest issue of the Archives of Dermatology. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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Originally published in MedPage Today by Charles Bankhead, MedPage Today Staff Writer Women can wait longer for their first Pap smear and then repeat the test less frequently, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). The organization now says women should begin cervical cancer screening with a Pap test at age 21. Subsequent tests should occur at ...

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Doctors have understood for some time that it was inevitable. The American Cancer Society has acknowledged that cancer screening has been oversold. It seems like every day you read in the newspaper that what was standard medical care yesterday is now no longer recommended. Don't doctors know anything? Well, actually they do. And what seems like paradoxical behavior, no longer recommending aggressive screening for certain cancers, actually represents a more sophisticated ...

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What if a non-partisan, authoritative entity wrote a robust, evidence-based guideline, but nobody followed it? That is precisely what's happening with the USPSTF's recent revision of their breast cancer screening recommendations. The change most find problematic is their recommendation that women younger than 50 not undergo any breast cancer screening, such as with a mammogram. Here are their reasons explaining why:

The harms resulting from screening for breast cancer include psychological harms, ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Chris Emery, MedPage Today Contributing Writer Complications from first trimester abortions performed by family practitioners are rare, and family doctors could help address abortion provider shortages across the U.S., a new study found. Among more than 2,500 abortions performed by family physicians, abortion was successful without complications in 96.5% of patients using medications (95% CI 95.5% ...

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The Wall Street Journal and other sources reported on a study from the Annals of Internal Medicine that showed that most US doctors don't know the guidelines of how often women should get a pap smear. More importantly, doctors were doing a lot of pap smears on women who didn't need them. In all the talk about health care reform, reducing costs by eliminating unnecessary testing has been mentioned multiple ...

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Breast cancer screening has been scaled back, according to the recent recommendations of the USPSTF. That's the right move. Although women aged 50 to 74 years should receive a mammogram every 2 years, evidence of breast cancer screening in other age groups has been marginally conclusive at best, and non-existent when it comes to clinical self-exams. Furthermore, the guidelines implicitly acknowledge the downsides of cancer screening, including the possibility of biospies ...

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Originally published in MedPage Today by Michael Smith, MedPage Today North American Correspondent Although the pandemic H1N1 flu tends to strike younger people, it can be life-threatening when older people are infected, California researchers said. In the first four months of the pandemic, 1,088 people in the state needed inpatient care or died of the pandemic flu strain, according to Janice Louie, ...

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There is plenty to criticize in our bungling trek toward health reform. Leaders on the right, left and at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue have sidestepped the crucial conversation of controlling the cost of care, in favor of partisan rhetoric about "death panels" and "rationing care." Worse, the entire focus of reform has centered on spending billions of dollars on technology solutions that will only make marginal changes in the cost and ...

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Originally published in Insidermedicine Both watching television and having a television on in the household are associated with a higher level of aggression in three-year-olds, according to research published in the latest issue of the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. id="play_continuous_flvs" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="385" height="239" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
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