Conditions

5 diabetes posts you may have missed

With entries dating back to 2004, here are 5 classic blog posts on diabetes:

1. Does Avandia cause heart attacks, and why the RECORD study is important

2. Will diabetes derail Sonia Sotomayor’s chance to become a Supreme Court justice?

3. Prescribing insulin for diabetes, do endocrinologists have a financial incentive to do so?

4. Are Actos and Avandia to blame for rising diabetes costs?

5. Prescription medication pay for …

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How soon should patients receive their test results?

And should you assume that no news is good news?

The answer is no. According to a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, 7 percent of abnormal test results from primary care offices were never reported to the patient. And in a large, unnamed, academic medical center, that number ballooned to 23 percent.

That’s almost a quarter of abnormal test results from that center that patients were never …

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Prostate cancer screening in blacks, and the lack of balanced information

Prostate cancer screening continues to be a controversial issue.

Regular readers of this blog know about the risks of cancer screening, especially prostate cancer, which can lead to unnecessary biopsies necessitating invasive procedures that can lead to life-altering side effects. All for a slow-growing cancer that may not have led to death.

The problem with prostate cancer is that the current detection methods, like the prostate specific antigen, are not …

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Should patients care how many times a doctor has performed chorionic villus sampling?

When it comes to procedures, experience counts.

In a recent op-ed in the WSJ, maternal-fetal medicine fellow Adam Wolfberg talks about the potential complications of chorionic villus sampling (CVS) (via Suture for a Living). Used to assess the risk of Down Syndrome in the fetus, it involves inserting a 3 1/2 inch needle into the mother’s uterus to obtain cells from the placenta. The rate of miscarriage is …

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Should Steve Jobs talk more openly about his pancreatic cancer?

As you have read here and elsewhere, Apple’s Steve Jobs recently underwent a liver transplant for a rare form of pancreatic cancer.

He, however, is not talking publicly about his case, and Apple is tightly controlling the information surrounding Mr. Jobs’ health.

Certainly, he is entitled to his medical privacy, but there are some who believe he should use his stature and celebrity to raise the awareness of pancreatic cancer. …

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Why did Michael Jackson have a heart attack, and CPR by Dr. Conrad Murray

Michael Jackson suffered a cardiac arrest. And still, that’s really all we know for sure.

Medical websites continue to speculate on the possible causes. Over at theheart.org, doctors who were interviewed continue to speculate on Jackson’s narcotic use, including Demerol, which I wrote about a few days ago. Indeed, a spokesperson for the American College of Cardiology, cardiologist …

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Did Demerol cause Michael Jackson’s cardiac arrest and death?

Michael Jackson’s death continues to consume the news cycle.

There is currently no clear explanation. Some have speculated that it may be related to the narcotic pain drug, Demerol. According to this report from the UK’s The Sun, “An Emergency Room source at UCLA hospital said Jackson aides told medics he had collapsed after an injection of potent Demerol …

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How did Michael Jackson die, and the medicine behind sudden cardiac death

Michael Jackson is dead at age 50.

I’ve received several e-mails to comment on this story, but there’s really too few details to go on. I’m sure more will emerge in the near future.

According to news reports, emergency medical services were called to his home in Los Angeles, where he was found in presumed cardiac arrest. CPR …

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Steve Jobs received a new liver, and the ethics surrounding his transplant

Orac, a general surgeon who blogs at Respectful Insolence, writes the most comprehensive entry I’ve seen thus far on Apple’s Steve Jobs’ liver transplant.

For those interested in the medicine behind the transplant, go and read his post in its entirety. I’d like to highlight some of the potentially questionable ethics surrounding the case.

For one, there is the question why Mr. …

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Ten top medical blog posts, May 2009

Here are the top posts from the past month, based on the number of times they were viewed.

1. Can you really kill a man by gluing his anus shut?

2. What is the most accurate medical show on television?

3. Will diabetes derail Sonia Sotomayor’s chance to become a Supreme Court justice?

4. Is Cheerios really a drug, and why is the FDA targeting the cereal?

5. Is House …

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Does Avandia cause heart attacks, and why the RECORD study is important

The diabetes drug Avandia’s fate hangs in the balance tomorrow.

It’s a much maligned medication, with famed cardiologist Steven Nissen gaining publicity for its possible association with heart attacks.

Tomorrow, during the American Diabetes Association annual meeting, the final results of the RECORD study is due to be released. This is a study that was designed to answer the questions surrounding Avandia’s cardiovascular safety profile. Interim results had …

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The benefits of scanning war corpses

The military is learning from the dead.

In the past five years, every soldier who was killed in Iraq and Afghanistan has been given a CT scan. Why? In the hopes of creating a database of war injuries, which can be used to better equip and treat future soldiers.

The effort has already paid dividends. While examining the data, it was noticed that chest tubes used to treat pneumothoraces …

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Creative thyroid cancer screening ads

With the USPSTF in the midst of updating their recommendations for thyroid cancer screening, this advocacy organization is coming out with some seriously creative ads.

thyroid cancer
"Thyroid cancer is growing 7 times faster than breast cancer. Ask your doctor to check your neck. It could save your life."

[caption id=”attachment_30177″ align=”alignnone” width=”226″ caption=”"Thyroid cancer is growing 6 times faster than …

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Lung cancer CT screening produces false positives and isn’t ready for prime time

Controversy continues to swirl over chest CT scans to screen for lung cancer.

MedPage Today reports on a recent study that continues to suggest that it isn’t ready for general use yet.  Not surprisingly, CT scans had more false positives than traditional chest x-rays when used to look for pulmonary masses.

The probability of a false positive was 21 percent after one scan, and 33 percent after two. This is …

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A 10-year old girl with breast cancer, how much media coverage should she receive?

Is the media alarming the public by highlighting this exceedingly rare case?

As reported by ABC News, a 10-year old girl was diagnosed with invasive secretory carcinoma.  She has a good prognosis, but must undergo a mastectomy and chemotherapy.

Some are worrying that the media attention will alarm mothers and young girls, perhaps pushing them to obtain screening tests such as self-breast exams and mammograms.  But the last thing we need to …

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15 cancer screening posts you may have missed

With entries dating back to 2004, here are 15 classic blog posts on cancer screening:

1. Not all screening tests lead to early, better treatment

2. Will the Pap smear soon be replaced by a DNA test to detect cervical cancer?

3. Should men still be screened for prostate cancer?

4. Should we start screening women for ovarian cancer?

5. How much do we really need mammograms?

6. How screening …

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If you think medical school is already difficult, try doing it while battling leukemia

That is the situation facing Yale medical student Natasha Collins.

She lives in New Haven, Connecticut and splits her time between classes at Yale and chemotherapy sessions in New York City. That arrangement had been keeping the cancer at bay for over a year, but she recently relapsed this past February.

A bone marrow transplant is potentially life-saving, but because she’s half-Caucasian, half-black, finding a match …

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How do I prevent and treat swine flu, and, is a pandemic imminent?

Swine flu is in the news, with documented cases of human to human transmission.

According to news reports, this outbreak has “pandemic potential,” with at least 62 people dying in Mexico, and over 1,000 cases reported in that country.

Swine flu, or Swine Influenza, is caused by the Influenza type A virus found in pigs. Until now, human infection has been uncommon, with most cases involving …

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Who is responsible for an abnormality on pre-operative testing, or, aren’t radiologists doctors too?

A few weeks ago, I cited a case where a urologist failed to follow-up on a deadly cancer found on a pre-operative chest x-ray.

Jeffrey Parks takes exception to my opinion, and instead, wonders why the radiologist shouldn’t shoulder some of the follow-up responsibility.

“For some reason radiologists are immune to the usual expectations of physician responsibility,” writes Dr. Parks. “It must be nice to just …

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Op-ed: Not all screening tests lead to early, better treatment

The following op-ed was published on April 23rd, 2009 in the USA Today.

As a primary care doctor, it’s heartening to hear President Obama call for “the largest investment ever in preventive care.” That means more people, for one, will be undergoing tests to screen for various forms of cancer. But this might be one of those cases where what sounds like common sense is actually more …

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