Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 56-year-old man is being evaluated after his 18-year-old son had a syncopal episode during a high school basketball game and was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The patient has had no symptoms, including with physical activity such as golfing or playing tennis. Medical history is unremarkable, and a ...

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Science is in a constant state of flux. Theories are put forth to explain natural phenomena, based on the best knowledge of the day. These theories are tested. If they correctly predict future observations, the theories become more credible. If, however, these theories fail to predict accurately, they require modification or outright dismissal. What is considered “settled science” one day may be turned upside down the next day as new data comes ...

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Human beings have grappled with obesity for thousands of years. Greek philosopher and physician Galen described “bad humors” as the cause of obesity and prescribed low-calorie foods, massages, baths, greens and garlic to his patients to help them slim down. In the 18th century, William Banting successfully lost weight following a low-carb diet and spread his mantra to the public in a pamphlet called a “Letter ...

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I saw two patients with a chief complaint of bubbles in their urine this month. One middle-aged woman had eaten some wild mushrooms she was pretty sure she had identified correctly, but once her urine turned bubbly a few days later, she came in to make sure her kidneys were OK. Even though she was feeling quite well, they were not, and she ended up going straight to Cityside hospital for IV ...

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I cannot get behind fat acceptance, or better stated in medical lingo as “normalizing obesity.” As a physician and as someone who has been obese or morbidly obese my adult life, I know first hand what it’s like to hate my body and feel ashamed of it. I still do this very moment as I type this, that’s something I have to work on. Funny thing is, I am much more ...

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Does the flu shot cause the flu? Let me tell you, without a doubt, that the flu shot does not give you the flu. This is perhaps one of the most common misconceptions I hear as a physician. People absolutely swear by it. I’ve even had people tell me that family members got the flu shot and then died suddenly. I’m sympathetic, but how misguided! Before we talk more about the flu ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 56-year-old man is evaluated for painless intermittent bloody urine of 6 weeks' duration. History is significant for granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener granulomatosis) diagnosed 10 years ago, which is now in remission; he was treated with prednisone for 3 years and oral cyclophosphamide for 1 year. ...

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The children of survivors are important to the Holocaust story.  The children are the future of the past.  For a time, it seemed that no one would be left to create a future.  That history has been so carefully, lovingly chronicled.  It must be preserved.  If it is preserved and told, the possibility exists that there will be no more war.  That is always the hope of the survivors. This is ...

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I'm a pathologist and the main way I communicate to the outside world — to your doctor and ultimately to you, the patient is via the pathology report. But the short missives I send from behind the microscope lack any excitement and can fall short of full communication. Here’s the usual story:

Skin left scapula, biopsy Nodular basal cell carcinoma Negative for perineural invasion Margin status: Positive
Doesn't sound real interesting, does it? How about a more ...

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Few things in primary care give patient and doctor mutual and instant gratification. It’s been a while since I reduced a “nursemaid's elbow” or a spontaneous shoulder dislocation other than my own, or a finger dislocation, but those all count. I once wrote about curing deafness in a man with a movement disorder by flushing ear wax more or less on the run as he bobbed around the exam room. That ...

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