I had an interesting exchange with one of our nurses recently about a long-term patient of ours. The e-mails went something like this:

Got a fax from —-’s insurance that his Lipitor won’t be covered anymore.  They will cover simvastatin, lovastatin, and pravastatin.  Let me know what you want to do. Charlie
He’s on darunavir, and all three of those statins are contraindicated because of drug-drug interactions. Rosuvastatin? Paul
Checked with them — rosuvastatin needs ...

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All thoughtful physicians I know consider the historical theory and philosophy of homeopathy to be rubbish, balderdash, preposterous, BS, or, politely, NOT PLAUSIBLE; thus, not even worth testing for safety and efficacy. Then, why, when one asks Mr. Google by entering ... Homeopathy ... and clicking, does one receive 9.9 million results? And, why does the National Health Service of the U.K. continue to fund homeopathic hospitals, clinics, and treatments? And why are ...

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As undergraduate premedical students, we learned about narrative medicine by chance in a New York Times article titled "Learning to Listen." After exploring the research of Dr. Rita Charon, we were both drawn to the new field and what it had to offer us as future medical professionals. The Times article explains, "Through literature, [Dr. Charon] learned how stories are built and told, and translated that ...

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Though there are few subjects as immediate to my experience as that described in Gardiner Harris's article in The New York Times, "More Doctors Say No to Endless Workdays,"  perhaps the truest indication of my opinion on the matter may be the fact that, upon first glance at the headline, I didn't feel much need to read the rest of the article.  More doctors say no to endless ...

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How and when do new medical technologies become the standard of care? A recent study showed that the use of CT scans in hospital emergency departments rose sixteen percent between 1995 and 2007.

Looks a bit like a medieval torture doughnut.
The only thing that surprises me about this is that it’s not more. Way more. I remember the first time I actually ordered a CT scan on a patient all by myself, in ...

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When Professional Responsibility class began, I was most excited at the idea of not having to sit through another lecture on proteins and cell transport. I was also looking forward to the class where we would be using clickers from the Library to poll audience responses during the lecture, as doing something while listening to someone talking has a much higher success rate in getting ...

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Should all health care professionals have a social media presence? No, not necessarily. Did I surprise you? Here I am rattling on and on about how health care professionals should all have a blog, tweet, link up and now I’m saying not everyone needs to hop onto social media. Let me explain the apparent contradiction. If you are a solo provider and hope to stay financially solvent, you need to market online. All ...

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shutterstock_146654615 At some point, the novelty of a new baby wears off. Waking up at two in the morning loses some of its appeal.  Parents often tell me that their baby does not sleep well.  I tell them how they can get their child to sleep through the night in just three nights.  I explain that learning to sleep is a training process, either ...

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There are many more individuals with end stage kidney failure, heart failure, chronic lung disease, or liver failure who would benefit from a transplanted kidney, heart, lung or liver than are available. Similarly, there are many people with unstable, difficult to control diabetes that could benefit from a ready source of pancreatic insulin-producing islet cells. Today the only option for more organs available for transplant ...

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by Alison McKnight We are surrounded by technology. No matter where you go, you will find technology rearing its face, whether ugly and ungodly or tempting and beautiful. These advances have brought both good and evil to many professions, especially healthcare. Twenty years ago, you would not have found signs instructing people to turn off their cell phones in physician offices. Now these signs litter both ...

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