Anyone considering attending a Caribbean or any foreign medical school should do due diligence. An Internet search is step one. If the school does not list residency match statistics, that could be a red flag. It would not be easy to accomplish, but try to speak with some current students or recent graduates of any schools you are thinking about. If the school won't give you any names, use caution, and ...

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shutterstock_216555211 I am lucky enough, from time to time, to be invited to speak to young women who want to be surgeons when they "grow up." I always have a hard time striking a balance between what I should share that is positive and inspirational and what I should share that is a little harsh and uncomfortable. Once, I turned to my ...

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shutterstock_210504655 If the analogy between medical training and a fraternity is true, then medical students are the pledges. For many, the most grueling part of this pledge process is the third year surgery rotation where the modified Murphy’s Law is applicable almost daily: Anything a medical student can do wrong, a medical student will do wrong. In a fraternity, pledges can do no right. ...

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shutterstock_147929984 A few months ago, I was seeing an elderly man in the hospital with a sigmoid mass seen on his colonoscopy that day. He had presented to the hospital with fatigue and anemia, and the long meandering workup eventually zeroed in on this malignant appearing mass as the source. His daughter was in the room while I discussed the results, the ...

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I often get referrals from the town's free clinic.  As you would imagine, the patients often have a unique set of problems, coming as they do from the underserved segment of society. One such patient, Julia, was a fiftyish-year-old woman who had recently moved to town from California. She went to the free clinic (not really sure what the original complaint was) and ended up getting a physical exam that revealed ...

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shutterstock_121457908 Let's face it, residency is no picnic. A combination of on the job training and trial by fire, no physician who has gone through it and survived will ever forget the experience.  The emotions run from jubilation to sheer terror. It is inevitable that some of the people you interact with will leave a lasting impression. In the case of the ...

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How many times do we start out our day with the best of intentions? It’s probably most days, if you’re at all like me. Even when we’re going through a spell of negativity, we all try to pull it together for the sake of our patients, our staff, our families. A couple weeks ago, I was tempted to throw in the towel. It was one of those days when the last straw was ...

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shutterstock_115774717 My interns started the term with mixed career aspirations. One wanted to do interventional radiology, the other, "not sure." Now, in their last few weeks of our term, they're thinking about a surgical career. Which I think is great. I've been lucky enough to have had some great advice over the years, and I've nutted a few things out myself along the ...

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american society of anesthesiologistsA guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Clearly, physicians are the leaders of the health care team.  We were educated and trained for that role. But on the business and political sides of health care, maybe not so much. One reason is that the word “leadership” has a lot of different meanings.   A leader in one ...

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Waaaah-Hoo!! – Slim Pickins as Maj. ‘King’ Kong, riding the bomb in “Dr. Strangelove” I am converted. Like many doctors, I was very leary of social media, wary about using it, skeptical of its professional value. Especially Twitter, but really all of the platforms. No longer: I have embraced social media, and it has embraced me. I feel a little bit like Dr. Strangelove, only the subtitle is now “How I Learned To  Stop Worrying ...

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