If you had told me I would be writing someday on women’s issues, I would have grabbed a pulse oximeter and placed it on your finger to check your oxygen levels. As a physician scientist, I have spent the majority of my career reading, studying and writing on clinical medicine. Then, something changed. For years, I have had the pleasure of working with and for some pretty phenomenal men in medicine. ...

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As a physician, I am often discouraged when I turn on the news and read about the state of health care in our country. I can see all 397 sides of the debate and some truth in all sides. The enormous cost of medicine is overwhelming to comprehend for patients and families and even to those of us in medicine. I think it is important to know all that goes into ...

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Cancer treatment delays are sometimes inevitable. Here is a story, though, that haunts me. Years ago, long before the Affordable Care Act, I was asked to evaluate a very pleasant man with hoarseness in a local free clinic. He struggled to make himself heard. "Things have been getting worse and worse," he said. "When did you start losing your voice?" I asked. "About six weeks ago," he responded. "When it started getting more ...

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There are two schools of thought about how to extubate patients at the conclusion of general anesthesia: Allow the patient to wake up with the endotracheal tube in place, gagging on the tube and flailing like a fish on a line, while someone behind the patient’s head bleats, “Open your eyes!  Take a deep breath!” Or: Remove the endotracheal tube while the patient is still sleeping peacefully, which results in the smooth emergence ...

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Recently, the Los Angeles Times broke a story that Dr. Puliafito, former Dean of the Keck School of Medicine of USC, had been abusing drugs and keeping company with a group of younger individuals who engaged in drug use and illicit activity.  Much of this activity occurred while he was dean, and it is a shocking story: A 66 year-old titan of the field of ophthalmology, renowned for inventing ...

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"For what it's worth: it's never too late or, in my case, too early to be whoever you want to be. There's no time limit, stop whenever you want. You can change or stay the same, there are no rules to this thing. We can make the best or the worst of it. I hope you make the best of it. And I hope you see things that startle you. ...

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Travel is one of our passions. Spending time in unique places, trying new foods, and meeting different people is enjoyable and exciting. We are also passionate about our jobs as otolaryngologists. Humanitarian trips allow us to combine both of these loves. During these trips, I have repaired cleft lips/palates, removed cancers, reconstructed facial disfigurations and improved breathing and swallowing. Few things are more gratifying than being able to provide life-changing operations without ...

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Since I was a little girl, I have been called a lot of things. Sensitive. Funny. Strong-willed. Outgoing. Take-charge. Friendly. Bossy. Focused. And my favorite — domineering. I’ve always been a direct person. I’m an extrovert, which means I walk into a room and I am energized by the people around me. I am also a positive person; I assume you are my friend until you prove otherwise. On most days ...

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Be honest. What’s the first thing you think of when you hear the words "plastic surgery?" Breast implants? Nose jobs? Or maybe you’ll think about one of the numerous television programs out there that have featured the discipline: "Nip/Tuck?" "Botched?" "Grey’s Anatomy?" If so, you aren’t alone. Plastic surgery as a discipline is poorly understood by many, including primary care physicians, nurses, medical students and the public. Plastic surgeons perform many ...

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"Medicine is a science of uncertainty and an art of probability." - Sir William Osler Two people presented to my clinic on the same day with classic symptoms of head and neck cancer. Each reported several weeks of unilateral throat discomfort, ear pain, and a neck mass. Each was having some trouble swallowing and had changed his diet to accommodate the soreness. When they opened their mouths, each had a mass with a ...

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