My husband and I, both anesthesiologists, enjoy our Sunday mornings together -- coffee, the New York Times, a leisurely breakfast. No rush to arrive in the operating room before many people are even awake. Today, though, seeing reporter Jan Hoffman’s front-page article in the Times -- “Staying Awake for Your Surgery?” -- was enough to take the sparkle out of the sugar. Her article on how much better it ...

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After writing my 21st post about appendicitis back in November, I swore I would not write about it again for the foreseeable future. Well, the future is now because investigators from the United Kingdom and Canada just published a meta-analysis including ten papers and 413 children about the efficacy and safety of nonoperative treatment for appendicitis in children. They concluded that nonoperative management is effective in 96 percent ...

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Telemedicine is often in the news and until recently I had only casually glossed over the latest articles. The details I paid little attention to, but the headlines I would remember. “Great for rural areas” I would read! “Extend physician reach!” “Get specialists to greater numbers of patients with unique conditions!” As a nearly graduated anesthesia resident in a large city with an abundance of doctors, I didn't think telemedicine would have ...

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As a medical student, I had nightmares about my first day in the OR: scrubbing incorrectly, contaminating a sterile field, forgetting the anatomy I had so carefully studied the night before. It seemed like the only thing I could do in that artificially lit room was mess up. After a few cases I came to love the routine and ceremony of each surgery: the timeout; the rhythmic pattern of suture, ...

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Among surgeons, it’s pretty common knowledge that residents and other providers may perform non-critical parts of a patient’s procedure. This not only helps residents and other trainees gain valuable surgical experience, it also gives patients better and faster access to high-demand surgical expertise. The question is this: How well are surgeons explaining these facts to their patients? Recent guideline updates by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) underscore the need ...

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A couple years ago, I reached the seven-year mark after my initial board certification with the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA). At the time, it was a significant milestone. I was eligible to take the all-important Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesia (MOCA) exam. Diplomates of the ABA -- that’ right, I’m considered a diplomate -- in other words, a board-certified anesthesiologist. Diplomates were encouraged and incentivized to take the $2,100 exam ...

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It is no secret that physicians are disenchanted with the changes in medicine and can be overheard saying that they do not want their children to go into the profession. Has the practice of medicine deteriorated to the extent we say it has, and are there more appealing options? According to a Doctors Company survey of 5,000 physicians, 9 out of 10 physician respondents indicated an unwillingness to recommend health care ...

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american society of anesthesiologistsA guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. During the course of our careers as physicians, we have cared for or are aware of an elderly patient in the intensive care unit or ward who has exhibited delirium, or an acute confused state. This is particularly common after surgery and anesthesia. While simply being ...

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I was very saddened to learn this past week of another physician who died by suicide.  This, the untimely death of a young and brilliant mother of two, is a horrifying tragedy. I do not write this to pretend I know anything about this recent tragedy.  I write this as a sort of case report on myself.  I was an at risk physician at one point. I’ll start where the problems most ...

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I burned out, big and bad.  I can see that now.  My practice environment had become gradually untenable and every attempt I made to change it was blocked.  My call schedule was inflexible and a lot more frequent than when I started my job.  The hospitalists and ED kept sending me cases I didn’t feel qualified to manage, but as it was usually the middle of the night and I ...

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