shutterstock_60295858 I will always remember my awkward medical school interviews. Filled with bioethical scenarios and questions to measure my ability to prevent an impaired physician from practicing, the interviewers seemed hardly interested in my prior career achievements or humble beginnings. Such discussions carried on through the first two years of medical school. They never taught us how health care reimbursement works or why ...

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We’ve almost made it. Long gone are the purgatory stints of library study, slaving to solve esoteric problems relating to planks and pulleys. Innumerable several-day exams have been conquered and tucked far away in our memories, hopefully never to haunt us again. The last of our forced smiles and faux-eager nods have been displayed toward ambivalent instructors and medical teams during the throes of our student rotations. Post-graduate training is also nearing ...

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It's that time of year again. Bright-eyed fourth years have begun wandering our hospital in uncomfortable shoes and fancy suits. They look equal parts nervous and excited, ready to embark on the insane adventure that is being an intern. But first, they have to survive interview season and Match Day:  a stressful, expensive, hoop-jumping endeavor that culminates with an envelope containing the result of eight years of hard work. Wouldn't ...

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It’s really quite easy to kill a doctor. Here’s a step-by-step process guaranteed to succeed at least 400 times a year: Start early. Be sure to denigrate medical students whenever possible. Even if they’ve come to the profession later in life and have accomplished all kinds of amazing things personally and professionally (which don’t count, of course, since those are other professions) they don’t know squat about medicine and you do. Make sure to emphasize ...

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shutterstock_215289142 When my husband started medical school, we immediately got hooked on getting student loans. After spending years of being broke all through undergrad, we felt like we were getting “magic” checks in the mail. Life was good. We could go out to dinner, buy our son the toys we wanted him to have, go shopping. We were enjoying all the luxuries ...

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Do physicians in training take better care of patients or perform better on their exams when their work hours are restricted?  Two recent studies in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggest that the answer is no.  In one, patients of surgery residents showed no difference in morality or postoperative outcomes after duty hour restrictions were implemented.  Their test scores did not improve either.  In the other, hospitalized Medicare ...

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You’ve made it. Four years of college, four years of medical school, and three years (sometimes four or five) of residency, depending on the specialty you chose. You’ve earned a prestigious title. You are a doctor. But wait, you are not done yet. Want to be a cardiologist, oncologist or gastroenterologist? Add another three years to the eleven spent to become an independent practitioner. Another three years of interest rate on that six ...

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Despite the changes around us, the training of physicians has stayed much the same. Sure, there are new work hour limitations and a push to move towards competency-based assessments, but the overall structure of our training remains largely untouched. We spend the vast majority of our time training in hospitals, with the remaining time spent practicing in traditional outpatient clinics. However, health care is being increasingly delivered outside these two arenas. ...

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I'm on my family medicine rotation right now.  One of my preceptors is about 80 years old and went through medical school in the 1960s.  He is still sharp as a tack; he used to do C-sections, hernia repairs, appendectomies, fracture repairs and get this -- emergency burr holes for subdural hematomas (a.k.a. neurosurgery).  He stopped around 1997, mostly because he got tired of his morning cases getting bumped constantly ...

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My department had a problem that harmed patients on at least a weekly basis. It was well-known, but it seemed there was no viable solution.

My supervising attending was in his seventies and highly regarded at my hospital, having held powerful administrative positions for decades. About ten or so years ago, he stepped down from running the hospital, and ...

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