There’s a lot of talk about quality metrics, pay for performance, value-based care and penalties for poor outcomes. In this regard, it’s useful to ask a basic question. What is quality? Or an even simpler question, who is the better physician? Let’s consider two fictional radiologists: Dr. Singh and Dr. Jha. Dr. Singh is a fast reader. Her turnaround time for reports averages 15 minutes. Her reports are brief with a paucity of ...

Read more...

In a recent verdict a jury in Massachusetts awarded $16.7 million in damages to the daughter of a Bostonian lady who died from lung cancer at 47, for a missed cancer on a chest x-ray. The verdict reminds one of the words of John Bradford, the heretic, who was burnt at the stakes. “There but for the grace of God go I.” Many radiologists will sympathize with both the patient who ...

Read more...

It is so nice to be right. To summarize what I wrote almost 4 years ago, based on my experience, patients and families will accept the theoretical risk of a future cancer if it means they'll get an accurate diagnosis. A recent study validates that opinion. MedPage Today reports that before receiving any recommendation for CT scanning, 742 parents of children who presented with head injuries ...

Read more...

Recently, a family physician colleague asked me to explain why the Affordable Care Act requires private health insurers to provide first-dollar coverage for preventive services that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force assigns an "A" or "B" (recommended) rating, but allows public insurers (Medicare and Medicaid) to determine if and how they will cover these services. Until recently, the question hadn't come up, since Medicare has agreed to cover pretty ...

Read more...

Why doesnt everyone have a pocket ultrasound machine? For about 2 years now a tiny ultrasound machine has been part of my standard physical exam tools as I take care of patients in the hospital and in the outpatient clinic. In November 2011, I first picked up an ultrasound transducer in a continuing medical education course on bedside ultrasound for emergency physicians. I am an internist, not an emergency physician, ...

Read more...

Having worked with radiologists a lot, I have great respect for their specialty. The job is indeed a very difficult one. Without seeing the patient (the most difficult part of what they do), they have to thoroughly comb through every image put in front of their eyes and give us their assessment of what’s abnormal and what’s not. Their interpretation will be one that other doctors will hang their hats ...

Read more...

Earlier this year, I completed a medical rotation in Africa. It was an amazing, eye-opening experience. While I expected it might be difficult to acquire newer, more expensive medications and procedures, I had anticipated that, given limited resources, there would be some rationale in deciding which medications and procedures would be available. I was deeply mistaken in this assumption. During my time abroad, I watched several patients with heart attacks pass ...

Read more...

A recent editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine lauded, albeit cautiously, point-of-care ultrasound that has risen to such an extent that it is now becoming an integral part of medical education. Could the availability of ultrasound revolutionize clinical medicine in much the same way Laennec’s stethoscope broke the acoustic barrier? Certainly this possibility can’t be ruled out. But I am not so sanguine. One thing I’m sure about: Indiscriminate ...

Read more...

A respiratory physician who I worked for had an uncanny ability of predicting the diagnoses the admitting junior doctor would fail to consider in patients presenting acutely with difficulty in breathing. He was using a checklist, which he developed after years of observing his housestaff. As a surgical intern I was once praised for my presence of mind in cross matching blood for a patient with a rare blood group who ...

Read more...

Supporters of the most recent paper from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study (CNBSS) falsely contend that only radiologists are criticizing this study. This simply is not true. The Canadian study flaws have been well documented for decades. Robert E. Tarone at the National Cancer Institute (who isn't a radiologist) wrote in 1995 that there was a statistically significant excess of advanced cancers that were allocated to the mammography ...

Read more...

22 Pages

Most Popular