Americans think that most physicians have it made. Theyre wrong. There’s at least one hidden reason the health care system is failing people who just want some face time with a doctor: too many dedicated physicians are not just overwhelmed but burned out. According to a 2012 JAMA Internal Medicine Mayo Clinic study, 46% of all U.S. physicians are emotionally exhausted, feel cynical about work or have lost their sense of personal accomplishment ...

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There are few jobs more chaotic than that of physician, at least based on my own experience. Yes there is a schedule of sorts: hospital rounds, procedures, office patients. Unfortunately things rarely go as planned. There is a particularly sick patient on rounds who needs a temporary pacing wire placed. There are more consults than expected. The procedure that was planned to take up to 2 hours takes 4 hours because of ...

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Unify the standard to practice primary care An excerpt from The Demise of Medicine. As with the Aesop fable, familiarity breeds contempt. The role and responsibilities of the physician are being slowly eroded by the media, the legal profession, and even other allied health professions. The tools we hone and more importantly the thought processes physicians develop to diagnose and treat are different than the tools nurses or any other ...

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Inevitably, there will come a time in our medical journeys where we will have to have a difficult conversation with a family about the passing of a loved one. Sometimes, it will be an expected event after a patient has dealt with a long illness at an advanced age; other times, it will be an unexpected event in a person who looked healthy a short time before. These events can ...

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Medical errors are estimated to be the third leading cause of death in America’s hospitals. Though some of these errors are beyond physician control, many are the direct result of physician action and inaction. I spend a lot of time thinking about how to reduce these errors and I (like many of my peers) lose sleep over the mistakes I witness. When you ask patients what quality is most important in a ...

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To improve patient care, doctors rely on research and published information. According to an American Medical News report, professional journals are still the most popular source of up-to-date medical information among doctors. These medical publications inform physicians on new drugs and treatments, and they contain peer-reviewed studies that both physicians and patients assume are scientifically accurate. But all too often, research findings aren’t as scientific as they should be. And some are flat-out ...

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Jet lag, also known as desynchronosis or flight fatigue, is defined as “extreme tiredness and other physical effects felt by a person after a long flight across several time zones.” Besides insomnia, symptoms of jet lag include weakness, fatigue, dehydration, body aches, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, irritability, and memory loss. Jet lag is one of the circadian rhythm disorders; others include shift work disorder, sleep phase disorder, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm. Symptoms ...

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It is possible to categorize every human ailment, and assign every disease a code. This is called the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), which was first formalized as a short list of malaises at a meeting in Paris in 1900. Since then, this list has been revised ten times, getting longer each time, in an effort to aid epidemiological and policy matters around the world. The ninth edition (ICD-9) has ...

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There is a growing group of articulate and engaged patients committed to getting access to all their medical information in order to be better positioned to work collaboratively with their clinical teams. Published studies like the OpenNotes project have consistently shown significant benefits and a lack of serious problems. Health care systems are slow to change and just beginning to understand both the need and value to this ...

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There is no doubt that Affordable Care Act has changed the landscape of medicine in the U.S.  Now, private practice is becoming a thing of the past. Financial pressures, increasing regulatory requirements, electronic medical records and outrageously complex coding systems are forcing long time private physicians to enter into agreements with academic centers and large hospital systems in order to survive. As a result, medicine today is more about increasing patient ...

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