Part of a series. A common criticism of direct primary care (DPC, membership/retainer/concierge practices) is the added expense: “Isn’t it too expensive?” Ways to think about the cost are to prioritize expenditures and to consider potential savings that make it cost effective. I gave examples of three direct primary care practices in an earlier post. Here is a recap of costs. AtlasMD’s annual fee is $600 for a young adult and ...

Read more...

A few weeks ago, my husband and I took my parents to dinner at one of my favorite restaurants. I was excited to go because the food is excellent and the customer service is top notch. In the past, I’d always had a great experience ... until then. That night, the restaurant was packed as they were offering half-priced desserts. My husband and I arrived first. I noticed when we ordered ...

Read more...

Direct primary care (DPC) and concierge medicine are rapidly growing models of primary care. Though the terms are used interchangeably, both are not the same. Such liberal use of terms, many times by even those within the industry, confuses those who are attempting to understand how these primary care models operate. As former concierge physician for the Pebble Beach Resorts, and subsequent founder of one of the nation’s largest direct ...

Read more...

I wholeheartedly support the message behind the project, What Works For Me. As health care professionals, we continually encounter human suffering and work under stressful conditions. As a family physician for the past 14 years, I have been fortunate enough to work in a variety of clinical settings, including several in general family practice. Currently, I practice family medicine in the sexual health clinic of a community health center. ...

Read more...

The big day has finally arrived. Your boss shakes your hand and wishes you well. Your colleagues gather around a cake and make small talk about landing the big fish in your retirement, or joke about what you’ll do now that you don’t have to come to the office. A cardboard box is filled with the contents of your desk: your family pictures, desktop trinkets, snowball paperweight, and stale candy. Your ...

Read more...

The New York Times had a front-page story about the growth of urgent care clinics nationwide. These are the places that are often referred to as “minor emergency rooms,” or “doc-in-a-box” outfits. Their value proposition is simple: You don’t need an appointment. The costs are “reasonable,” and much more transparent than usual medical care at a doctor’s office, emergency room, or hospital. Best of all: They can treat a majority of acute conditions and ...

Read more...

Most busy doctors completely forget (or ignore) the importance of integrating personal downtime and self-care into their schedules. It’s no surprise so many doctors wrestle with overwhelm. Downtime is crucial for stress management. What about you? Are you guilty of skipping your “you time?” No, I don’t mean attending a seminar, reading an article, or talking about stress reduction at a staff meeting. I mean, when is the last time you scheduled some real ...

Read more...

When it comes to preserving health and prolonging life, study after study shows that prevention is essential. From type 2 diabetes to early-stage prostate cancer, clinical trials have demonstrated that countless diseases can be avoided or even reversed through (often simple) lifestyle changes. We know the solution. Yet the challenge is reaching it. For example, tens of millions of overweight Americans are dieting at any given moment, but only a ...

Read more...

Top 10 ways to know its time to quit your job as a doctor Attention all doctors: The first three are mine. The rest are from miserable colleagues. All true. And common. If you’re a doctor and you recognize anything on this list, please quit your job. 10. You feel nauseated when you see your clinic logo; you alter your commute to avoid streets with your clinic’s billboard. 9. Discouraged by the general despair among staff, you ...

Read more...

William was doing great.  His C. Diff  was finally gone after a month taper of vancomycin.  He was stronger.  The nursing home staff reveled in how much progress was being made over such little time.  It seemed every one was ecstatic, except for, of course his family.  Every step this octogenarian took forward was accompanied by a litany of concerns and complaints from his daughter. If he was not gaining weight, ...

Read more...

Most Popular