I am of the belief that every ACO must be physician-led. We must depend on them not only for clinical improvement, but also for developing a culture of improvement. Culture is vitally important. Culture trumps dollars, technology, data, and about anything else you would use in clinical medicine. If I was getting into the ACO business, I would start recruiting clinicians that embrace these characteristics: 1. Team leadership. Every doc is a leader to some degree, ...

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“55-year-old man with history of laryngeal carcinoma, status-post radiation therapy, laryngectomy, bilateral neck dissection, with metastases to the lung, status post thoracotomy, currently undergoing chemotherapy who is being admitted for a for first-time seizure. Patient is a transfer from Riker’s Island.”
Prisoners are a common occurrence in Bellevue Hospital. This, however, was my first prisoner-patient. The hyphenation both as I write this now and as it formed as a concept in ...

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About a year ago, there was a great commercial that depicted the slowing of time as a free-falling, but worry-free, James Franco uses his smartphone to chart a safe landing on the billowy awning of a restaurant dozens of stories below.  There probably isn’t a single person who hasn’t, at one point or another, wished she or he could control time in order to navigate a better outcome.  And doctors ...

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It is well accepted among health economics wonks that the lion’s share of pharmaceutical company profits come when these companies hold exclusive rights to their products. Once their blockbuster pills go “generic,” competitors enter the marketplace and profits plummet. Consider captopril, a groundbreaking heart failure medication introduced in the early 80s by Bristol-Myers Squibb under the trade name Capoten. After making a fortune for the company, captopril went generic in 1996. ...

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In India, when the first heavy droplets of rain meet dry earth it releases a particular kind of smell: a dampness arising from sizzling soil that in Bengal we call shnoda gondho. It is raining on the second day we go to visit my grandfather in the hospital. He has been readmitted to the hospital, after spending a week recovering at home from a hospitalization for rib fractures and bleeding into his ...

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I drank the Kool-Aid early.  We installed our first EHR in 1996 with me doing the lion’s share of pushing and pulling.  While I’d ultimately turn my back on this passion, I had a number of notable accomplishments before walking down my road to Damascus.

  • Within a year of implementation, our practice became one of the top installations for our vendor.
  • Within two years, I was elected to the board of our user ...

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When I was a resident, I saw a middle-aged man, “Charles,” who came into the hospital after playing a round and a half of golf. When I looked at his right foot, he had an ulcer in the shape of a golf tee. He had played the entire day with a golf tee in his shoe and only noticed when he found drainage on his sock. The story sticks in ...

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Delivering bad news is part of my job, an important part. It is fashionable nowadays to speak of the doctor-patient relationship as a partnership. In the sense that both doctor and patient have important roles to play for the patient to get good care, that’s very true. But even in the best of times, it’s a very asymmetric partnership. Even in a run-of-the-mill visit for a sinus infection the patient and ...

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Dear patients, First of all, thank you for calling for an appointment. Seriously. Ever since I’ve gone open access, if the phone doesn’t ring I’m toast. And thank you for your interest in preventive care. The fact that it’s now free (well, no cost to you at time of service: trust me, it’s not “free”) has probably motivated more of you to call. That’s OK. But sometimes it seems that your ...

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medpagetodayFrom MedPage Today:

  1. Delayed Autism Diagnosis Common in Primary Care. Parents with autistic children were more likely to receive a passive, rather than a proactive response from a provider when raising concerns about their children's development compared with parents whose children exhibited signs of developmental delay.
  2. MOC Watch: ABMS President Rebuts Critics. ...

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