medpagetodayFrom MedPage Today:

  1. EHRs Take Center Stage in Battle to Control Hypertension. How did a group of community health clinics with a low-income and uninsured population and frequent no-shows achieve a hypertension control rate among the best in the country? Electronic health records.
  2. How Do You Bill For Teaching Parents? "When you ...

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When I was in kindergarten, my school bus used to drop me off at the hospital where my mother worked.  My older sister and I would sit quietly in my mom’s office and do our homework while she finished up her work.  Most of my friends would get stickers or McDonald’s for their good behavior, but if my sister and I were on our best behavior, my mom would reward ...

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Thanks to the measles outbreak, the news is full of stories on vaccines and anti-vaxxers. The blogosphere and Twitterverse and all the other social media dimensions are buzzing with invective against ignorant unvaccinated savages and their backward science denial. For the record, I’m a pro-vaccine physician. My children have been and are vaccinated, despite being unsocialized homeschoolers. I’ve had my own share of needles; Physicians are mandated to have hepatitis B, ...

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It happens every once in a while in my practice: Parents ask if we can delay or skip certain vaccines, or spread them out. According to a study just published in the journal Pediatrics, I'm not alone -- in fact, 93 percent of pediatricians get asked the same thing. Now, it's important to point out that most families don't ask for this. Most families are fine with the current vaccine schedule -- ...

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You’ve likely seen the Jimmy Kimmel “public service announcement” on vaccines. Over 3 1/2 million people have viewed it on Youtube so if you’re not yet one of them you’ll likely add to the tally now. The first 3 minutes of the monologue are spot-on, and they’re also very funny. Jimmy takes a stand against the “anti-vaxxers.” He mentions that some parents are more scared of “gluten than small pox” ...

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To the staff overseeing my medically-complex child, My child has been in this world much longer than you expected; thus I’ve been in this relationship with you much longer than I expected. If I could break up with you and find someone new, believe me I would (I’m sure so would you some days). But that isn’t possible; we’re in a dysfunctional relationship. If we recognize this together and just come to an ...

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Dear doctor no longer seeing vaccine-hesitant families, I know that creating your “no tolerance” office-wide vaccine policy was not easy or came without soul-searching. I can only imagine the heated boardroom meetings and passionate arguments throughout the weeks the policy was being drafted. I trust it is because of your support and love for the families you currently care for that you felt the need to create the policy, and it ...

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Myth #1: Vaccines work by preventing disease in individuals who are vaccinated. Nope, that’s not actually true -- it’s quite wrong, but in a subtle way. And a misunderstanding of this concept, I think, has led to a lot of mischief. If people understood how vaccines really work, how they can best protect us from disease, it might help overcome some skepticism. Vaccines do indeed prevent diseases in individuals, but that’s ...

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shutterstock_126097835 When my older children were in elementary school, I sent in cupcakes for their birthdays or for class parties. My youngest is in elementary school now, and for his birthday, I sent in pencils and temporary tattoos for classmates -- because the school doesn't allow us to send in sweets anymore. When the change was first made, my reaction was: For real? Banning ...

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It’s 2015, and we’re talking about measles. Not Enterovirus. Not Ebola. Not RSV. Not influenza. Instead, we’re talking about a historical virus that was declared eradicated from the United States in 2000. Most pediatricians who began practicing within the last 15 years have never even seen the disease. Measles starts as a high fever followed by a cough, runny nose (coryza), red and watery eyes (conjunctivitis), and tiny white spots inside the mouth ...

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