A hospital is not the homiest of establishments. The bright neon lights, strange smells and piercing high-pitched beeps that radiate from the rooms of dormant patients fill the halls in a symphony of annoying sensory stimulation. But to someone recovering from a relationship that just ended, hospitals are heavenly. When the lonely silence of your one bedroom apartment is overwhelmingly loud, beeping IV lines and incoherent mumbles are surprisingly therapeutic. As ...

Read more...

"AAP Criticizes Retail-Based Clinics -- Again." I noticed the headlines rolling in about the AAP updated policy statement regarding retail based clinics.  The one above particularly caught my eye.  Something about the tacking on of “again” caught my attention.  It came across to me like we (pediatricians) were perceived to be saying something that was unnecessary, maybe even that we were just complaining. Throughout the day, I monitored my Twitter ...

Read more...

From MedPage Today:

  1. Calcium, Vitamin D Benefit Older Women. Postmenopausal women had significant improvement in their lipid profile with long-term calcium and vitamin D supplementation, data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) showed.
  2. Telemonitoring Cuts ICU Time, Boosts Outcomes. Remote monitoring in the intensive care unit was associated with lower mortality and shorter stays.
  3. Smart Phones and Not So Smart Parenting. Using ...

    Read more...

Adults are the ones who are supposed to be stressed, not kids. Childhood is supposed to be the stress-free part of life, right? Well, maybe not. At least not for teens. According to a recently released survey from the American Psychological Association, teens are actually more stressed than their parents. Researchers surveyed 1950 adults and 1,018 teens last summer and asked them a whole bunch of questions about the stress in their lives, and how ...

Read more...

I’ve been working with the latest electronic medical record (EMR) for almost a year now. You know the one. There are many positive changes, to be sure. It has helped me more than a few times with calculating doses for kids’ medications. I can now easily check in on my patients’ progress when they are admitted to the hospital. And, of course, the notes are far more legible. But what do ...

Read more...

The tests came fast and furious.  The diagnosis didn’t. One doctor was certain it was psychosomatic.  My twin younger brothers had been born a few months earlier, and I, seeking attention, was refusing to walk.  My mother kept looking. Another doctor couldn’t figure it out but gave a piece of advice.  “You have other children, right?  Be grateful. Take this one home, keep him comfortable, and when he is gone take comfort ...

Read more...

Why is it that illnesses that could be prevented by vaccination are on the rise despite scientific evidence they save lives? Recent articles noted measles exposure to people riding the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) public transportation system as well as more cases of whooping cough due to refusal to vaccinate and in some cases getting “non-medical” personal exemptions. The suggestion that vaccines could cause autism has been debunked. So ...

Read more...

Vaccine coverage rates, overall, remain very strong in the USA. Well over 90% of kids are well-vaccinated, and the rates of vaccine-preventable diseases remains very low. Newer vaccines have proven especially safe and effective, including immunizations against severe diarrheal illness and cancers of the cervix and throat. In many ways, we are staying ahead in our battle against vaccine-preventable disease. Yet: there are still pockets of intense resistance to vaccines, ...

Read more...

One aspect of the endless vaccine debate is the aspect of coercion some parents feel about requiring children to be vaccinated before they can go to school. The government mandates vaccination. But this isn’t really an absolute requirement. Although all 50 states ostensibly require vaccination, all but 2  (Mississippi and West Virginia) allow parents to opt out for religious reasons, and 19 states allow this for philosophical reasons. (See 
Read more...

A recent article in the New Republic, provocatively titled “ADHD Does Not Exist,” starts out well enough. The author, a psychiatrist with “over 50 years experience” points to the fact that ADHD describes a collection of symptoms, rather than their underlying cause. Using stimulants to control these symptoms, he argues, is analogous to prescribing pain medication for cardiac chest pain rather than addressing the underlying circulatory problem. But my ...

Read more...

Most Popular