I came across a really good post on the Daily Beast written by a pediatrician in New England, griping (appropriately) about parents who were unwilling to trust his judgment about vaccinating their children.

Why have so many patients lost trust in their doctors?

You might challenge the assumption that patients used to trust their doctors more, and that would be a fair question.  I haven’t found any ...

Read more...

They say medicine is a hard science, based on heavily scrutinized theories and proven postulates.  Medicine is supposedly made up of differentials, diagnostic workups, and medications aimed to alleviate or cure.  Everything is based on evidence, everything. But, today, something happened that hasn’t been researched using IRBs; something intangible that restored my faith in humanity. I was on my way home from a long day of being intensely questioned by residents ...

Read more...

Twitter -- its functions, benefits, risks and limitations -- has figured prominently in the heated discussion about Emma and Bill Keller's respective editorials in The Guardian (since deleted, though the archived version is still available) and the New York Times about the Twitter feed of Lisa Bonchek Adams. I have followed Lisa for a long time and greatly admire her thoughtful, highly personal tweets about the ups and downs ...

Read more...

Overheard in the gym: "Yeah, but I heard that ____ can be dangerous." "Oh, they wouldn't let us buy it if it was." Lately, the public's faith in the safety of prescription and over-the-counter drugs has been making me uneasy. Advances in drug development mean that many of us truly can live better lives through their wise use. But are we adequately guided and protected by a) regulators, b) our clinicians, c) a ...

Read more...

One year ago, my book, When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests, was published. My goal in this last year has been to travel around the country and talk about the book and its message of advocating to improve your health. I planned a 48-city itinerary where I’d crisscross the U.S. from Massachusetts to California and back. I’d speak at bookstores, libraries, nursing homes, universities, and community centers. What ...

Read more...

Here are a few words some physicians and medical professionals have used to describe patients who have turned to Dr. Google for information and advice on their medical conditions: irritating, suspicious, distrustful and challenging. Perhaps frustrated with physicians’ continued resistance to Internet-empowered patients, Dr. Kevin Pho urged them to “deal with” the fact that patients “Google their symptoms.” But, we all know the Internet-informed patient is old news.  I’m here with ...

Read more...

Many years ago, Alfred Korzybski wrote that "the map is not the territory." Gregory Bateson went on to argue that the map, which represents reality, is not the reality. This distinction has implications for the role of patient voice in health care planning and policy. Today, many organizations are making serious attempts to include the patient voice in policy and decision-making. Unfortunately, more than a few of them are ...

Read more...

What can we learn from an experiment conducted on a single person? That is, when the subject population (N) is a single person, aka N=1? How and how much do such findings contribute to knowledge about the experimental intervention? How relevant are results to other patients or populations or diseases? In assessing what is known about a phenomenon, how are these findings treated in comparison to studies with 30 or ...

Read more...

This is the time many of us make resolutions about our lives -- often tied to our health and wellness. As the health care industry enters a new era of consumerism, people are seeking more and more ways to take ownership over their health and health care. While data about doctors, hospitals and health outcomes are becoming more available and transparent, we still have a long way to go. Perhaps in a ...

Read more...

There are certain situations in my life where I feel really stupid. One is when CNBC's Squawk Box senior economics reporter Steve Liesman discusses the bond market. While I recognize the words he uses as English grammar,  I find almost every word to be incomprehensible gibberish.  Recently, he informed me that “given the Feds propensity towards quantitative easing in Q4 the 10 year yield could hit 3%.” I think that ...

Read more...

Most Popular